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Bus Stop Shelter Rules

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Rule status: Proposed

Agency: LPC

Comment by date: May 14, 2024

Rule Full Text
LPC-Proposed-Rules-re-Bus-Stop-Shelters-4.2.24.pdf

The Landmarks Preservation Commission (“LPC” or “the Commission”) is proposing to amend section 2-23 of its rules to permit the installation of bus shelters in areas under the LPC’s jurisdiction.

Attendees who need reasonable accommodation for a disability such as a sign language translation should contact the agency by calling 1 (212) 602-7254 or emailing [email protected] by May 8, 2024

Send comments by

  • Email: [email protected]
  • Mail: Landmarks Preservation Commission, Municipal Building, Attention: Mark Silberman, One Centre Street Room/Floor: 9th Floor ; New York, New York 10007

Public Hearings

Date

May 14, 2024
9:30am - 10:30am EDT

Location

Landmarks Preservation Commission
9th Floor North 1 Centre Street
New York New York 10007

Connect Virtually

We encourage anyone who wants to testify on the proposed rule revisions at the public hearing to sign up in advance by going to the LPC hearing page (https://www.nyc.gov/site/lpc/hearings/hearings.page) starting on May 9, 2024. On that page you can find updated hearing information, signup sheet links, the agenda and Zoom instructions if available. You can speak for up to three minutes. Please note that the hearing is for accepting oral testimony only and is not held in a “Question and Answer” format.

Disability Accommodation

Comments are now closed.

Online comments: 4

  • Dan Miller

    There’s no need for the LPC to weigh in on bus shelter installation–I applaud the proposed rule change. Installing bus shelters is perfectly appropriate for any location, including those in historic districts, and should be accomplished with a minimum of bureaucracy and process, so that we can install as many as possible.

    Comment added April 19, 2024 10:09am
  • Alex C

    I think it is absurd that you can propose to add bus shelters in a Landmark District without consideration for the historical aesthetic of the neighborhood, meanwhile you make it exorbitantly expensive for residents of those neighborhoods to appropriately maintain their property in line worth the historic designs that LPC to approve. I strongly oppose this change.

    Comment added April 19, 2024 9:43pm
  • Sunny Ng

    It’s ridiculous that the superficial consideration of aesthetics can hold up installation of public amenities like bus shelters. New York City is not a theme park, it needs to work for the people who live here. Unless we also regulate that street lamps need to be powered by oil, cars need to be drawn by horses, and banning the use of cell phones, there’s no reason why we can’t permit bus shelters in historic districts.

    Comment added April 23, 2024 6:59pm
  • Joanna Cawley

    Thank you for the opportunity to log three questions for comment:

    Will longstanding bus shelters in historic districts be considered for and updated profile to the new, narrower enclosure?

    Will there be permutations to the luminescence levels of static images and/or video advertisements relating to the sunrise, daylight, dusk, and overnight hours, to mitigate interfering, flashing, activated light displays into lower profile and street-facing dwellings in historic districts?

    What, if any plans are in play for bus shelters on the west side of Fifth Avenue, bordering Central Park and is LPC jurisdiction subject to change between 110th Street to 60th Street?

    Thank you for the favor of your reply.

    Comment added May 14, 2024 11:14am