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Department of Small Business Services
Codified Title: 
Title 66: Department of Small Business Services

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

New York City Department of Small Business Services

NOTICE OF ADOPTION 

Pursuant to the authority vested in the Commissioner of the Department of Small Business Services pursuant to section 1301 of the New York City Charter (Charter) and in accordance with the requirements of section 1043 of said Charter, the Department of Small Business Services has adopted amendments to Subchapter F of Chapter 11 of Title 66 of the Rules of the City of New York. These amendments were published in the City Record on November 19, 2019. A public hearing was held on December 20, 2019. No testimony was received at the hearing, and no comments were submitted to the Department of Small Business Services. This rule will go into effect 30 days after this publication in the City Record. 

Statement of Basis and Purpose

From school years 2014-15 through 2018-19, the Department of Small Business Services (DSBS) has administered a grant program to support the employment of experienced school bus workers impacted by changes in the Department of Education’s (DOE) contracts for school bus transportation.  Pursuant to the authority vested in DSBS by Section 1301 of the New York City Charter, DSBS is adopting a rule that will continue the grant program for the 2019-20 school year. 

Since 1979, following a school bus strike, DOE’s school bus contracts included employee protection provisions (EPPs) requiring school transportation contractors, among other things, to give priority in hiring to employees who became unemployed because of their employers’ loss of DOE bus contract work and to pay such employees the same wages and benefits they had received prior to becoming unemployed. 

Following the 2011 decision by the New York State Court of Appeals in L&M Bus Corp., et al., v. the New York City Department of Education, et al. (L&M), DOE did not include EPPs or similar provisions in solicitations for its school bus contracts. After the issuance of the first such post-L&M solicitation, there was a school bus strike in January and February of 2013.  

DSBS’s grant program, created by Local Law 44 of 2014, was designed to encourage school bus contractors providing transportation services to DOE to maintain the wages and benefits of those employees who had prior experience in the industry. In the years since 2014, grant programs successfully supported the employment of approximately 1,200 school bus workers. This rule continues the school bus employee grant program for the 2019-20 school year.

Effective Date: 
Sat, 02/08/2020

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments

Agency:
Comment By: 
Friday, December 20, 2019
Proposed Rules Content: 

 

Statement of Basis and Purpose

From school years 2014-15 through 2018-19, the Department of Small Business Services (DSBS) has administered a grant program to support the employment of experienced school bus workers impacted by changes in the Department of Education’s (DOE) contracts for school bus transportation.  Pursuant to the authority vested in DSBS by Section 1301 of the New York City Charter, DSBS is proposing a rule that would continue the grant program for the 2019-20 school year. 

Since 1979, following a school bus strike, DOE’s school bus contracts included employee protection provisions (EPPs) requiring school transportation contractors, among other things, to give priority in hiring to employees who became unemployed because of their employers’ loss of DOE bus contract work and to pay such employees the same wages and benefits they had received prior to becoming unemployed. 

Following the 2011 decision by the New York State Court of Appeals in L&M Bus Corp., et al., v. the New York City Department of Education, et al. (L&M), DOE did not include EPPs or similar provisions in solicitations for its school bus contracts. After the issuance of the first such post-L&M solicitation, there was a school bus strike in January and February of 2013.  

DSBS’s grant program, created by Local Law 44 of 2014, was designed to encourage school bus contractors providing transportation services to DOE to maintain the wages and benefits of those employees who had prior experience in the industry. In the years since 2014, grant programs successfully supported the employment of approximately 1,200 school bus workers. This proposed rule continues the school bus employee grant program for the 2019-20 school year.

 

Keywords:
Subject: 

Continuation of School Bus Grant Program

Location: 
Department of Small Business Services
1 Liberty Plaza 11th floor
New York, NY 10006
Contact: 

No contact

Download Copy of Proposed Rule (.pdf): 

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

New York City Department of Small Business Services
Jerome Avenue Relocation Grant Program

Notice of Adoption of Rule 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN PURSUANT TO THE AUTHORITY VESTED in the New York City Department of Small Business Services (DSBS) in accordance with Sections 1043 and 1301 of the New York City Charter. DSBS proposed a rule to create the Jerome Avenue Relocation Grant Program to help small businesses that may face displacement pressure from the City’s rezoning of the Jerome Avenue area in the Bronx, which was adopted by the City Council on March 22, 2018. The grants will be used to provide funds to assist small businesses with the relocation costs involved with moving from Jerome Avenue to a new location within the City. 

The proposed rule was published in The City Record on July 18, 2019. DSBS did not receive any comments concerning this rule. 

 Statement of Basis and Purpose

The Jerome Avenue Relocation Grant Program (“Program") will help small businesses that may face displacement pressures from the City’s rezoning of the Jerome Avenue area in the Bronx. See (ULURP number C 180051A ZMX), adopted March 22, 2018 as amended (“Jerome Avenue Rezoning”). The purpose of the Program is to encourage the retention of jobs within the City by providing grants to offset moving costs for small businesses relocating from designated sites under the Jerome Avenue Rezoning to any other part of the City.

Effective Date: 
Sat, 10/19/2019

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments

Agency:
Comment By: 
Thursday, August 22, 2019
Proposed Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose

The Jerome Avenue Relocation Grant Program (“Program") will help small businesses that   may face displacement pressures from the City’s rezoning of the Jerome Avenue area in the Bronx. See (ULURP number C 180051A ZMX), adopted March 22, 2018 as amended (“Jerome Avenue Rezoning”). The purpose of the Program is to encourage the retention of jobs within the City by providing grants to offset moving costs for small businesses relocating from designated sites under the Jerome Avenue Rezoning to any other part of the City.

Subject: 

Jerome Avenue Relocation Grant.

Location: 
Department of Small Business Services
1 Liberty Plaza 11th floor
New York, NY
Contact: 

No contact

Download Copy of Proposed Rule (.pdf): 

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose

 

During the 2014-15, 2015-16, 2016-17, and 2017-18 school years, the Department of Small Business Services (DSBS) administered a grant program to support the employment of experienced school bus workers who have been impacted by changes in the Department of Education’s (DOE) contracts for school bus transportation. Pursuant to the authority vested in DSBS by New York City Charter § 1301, DSBS is proposing a rule that would continue the grant program for the 2018-19 school year.

 Since 1979, following a school bus strike, DOE’s school bus contracts included employee protection provisions (EPPs) requiring school transportation contractors, among other things, to give priority in hiring to employees who became unemployed because of their employers’ loss of DOE bus contract work and to pay such employees the same wages and benefits they had received prior to becoming unemployed.

 

 

Following the 2011 decision by the New York State Court of Appeals in L&M Bus Corp., et al., v. the New York City Department of Education, et al. (L&M), DOE did not include EPPs or similar provisions in solicitations for its school bus contracts. After the issuance of the first such post-L&M solicitation, there was a school bus strike in January and February of 2013.

 

DSBS’s grant program, created by Local Law 44 of 2014, was designed to encourage school bus contractors providing transportation services to DOE to maintain the wages and benefits of those employees who had prior experience in the industry.  The 2014-15, 2015-16, 2016-17, and 2017-18 grant programs successfully supported the employment of approximately 1200 school bus workers. This proposed rule continues the school bus employee grant program for the 2018-19 schoolyear.

Effective Date: 
Fri, 12/21/2018

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments

Agency:
Comment By: 
Wednesday, October 17, 2018
Proposed Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose

 

During the 2014-15, 2015-16, 2016-17, and 2017-18 school years, the Department of Small Business Services (DSBS) administered a grant program to support the employment of experienced school bus workers who have been impacted by changes in the Department of Education’s (DOE) contracts for school bus transportation. Pursuant to the authority vested in DSBS by New York City Charter § 1301, DSBS is proposing a rule that would continue the grant program for the 2018-19 school year.

Since 1979, following a school bus strike, DOE’s school bus contracts included employee protection provisions (EPPs) requiring school transportation contractors, among other things, to give priority in hiring to employees who became unemployed because of their employers’ loss of DOE bus contract work and to pay such employees the same wages and benefits they had received prior to becoming unemployed.

Following the 2011 decision by the New York State Court of Appeals in L&M Bus Corp., et al., v. the New York City Department of Education, et al. (L&M), DOE did not include EPPs or similar provisions in solicitations for its school bus contracts. After the issuance of the first such post-L&Msolicitation, there was a school bus strike in January and February of 2013.

 

DSBS’s grant program, created by Local Law 44 of 2014, was designed to encourage school bus contractors providing transportation services to DOE to maintain the wages and benefits of those employees who had prior experience in the industry.  The 2014-15, 2015-16, 2016-17, and 2017-18 grant programs successfully supported the employment of approximately 1200 school bus workers. This proposed rule continues the school bus employee grant program for the 2018-19 schoolyear.

Subject: 

Continuation of School Bus Grant Program

Location: 
New York City Department of Small Business Services
110 William Street 7th Floor
New York, NY 10038
Contact: 

No contact

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose

New York City is home to more than 200,000 small businesses that collectively employ more than half of the City’s private sector workforce and provide needed jobs, goods and services in neighborhoods across the five boroughs. The vitality, diversity and longevity of small, local businesses are critical to the City’s economy and provide important benefits to residents of the City’s neighborhoods. For example, in 2014, businesses in NYC’s lower income neighborhoods employed 113,420 workers below the age of 30, a 31% increase from 2002.

Over the last fifteen years, the New York City Department of Small Business Services (DSBS) has administered programs to educate and support tens of thousands of local businesses and entrepreneurs seeking to conduct business in New York City. Recently, DSBS has responded to a growing demand to assist commercial tenants in understanding the content of their current or proposed leases, negotiating with landlords and resisting harassment. In addition, DSBS and governmental partners including the Department of City Planning, the Department of Housing Preservation and Development, the New York City Council, and the City’s Economic Development Corporation have worked to devise programs and policy interventions to support the survival of independent brick and mortar businesses and the vitality and safety of the commercial corridors in neighborhoods across the City. Interventions by these government partners have included restricting street frontage for banks and other less vulnerable business types through zoning amendments, passing legislation extending anti-harassment protections to commercial tenants, incentivizing affordable housing developers to include appropriate spaces for small business tenants on the ground floor of new developments and investing in improvements to commercial corridors.

DSBS establishes the Love Your Local Small Business Grant Program to expand the City’s economic development toolkit. This three-year pilot program will allow the City to develop and test interventions designed to help local, small businesses remain viable and stable participants in the lives of the City’s diverse neighborhoods despite changes in local real estate conditions. Devising these solutions is important, as 2016 data published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that job creation attributable to new establishments has been on a decline since the late 1990s and that businesses established prior to 1993 employ nearly 40% of the private sector workforce. Therefore, supporting existing, neighborhood businesses in making changes to allow them to survive and grow is an efficient means of supporting neighborhood economic well-being.

The Love Your Local Small Business Grant Program will incentivize commercial tenant businesses to share detailed information on challenges related to the costs of their leases with DSBS. DSBS will support a carefully selected set of those businesses in addressing those challenges through expert advice and implementation funding. DSBS will collect performance data from the businesses following these interventions, thus increasing the City’s understanding of what strategies are effective in preventing neighborhood businesses from closing due to rising rents and other rising real estate costs. This understanding will increase DSBS’ ability to provide meaningful advice and assistance to other businesses committed to retaining local jobs, helping to ensure the continued availability of locally valued goods and services, and preserving retail diversity. The Love Your Local Small Business Grant Program builds on the work of Small Business First, a DSBS program which invests in initiatives to help existing businesses thrive by connecting them to resources that will save them time and money.

Effective Date: 
Sat, 07/21/2018

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments

Agency:
Comment By: 
Tuesday, May 29, 2018
Proposed Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose

New York City is home to more than 200,000 small businesses that collectively employ more than half of the City’s private sector workforce and provide needed jobs, goods and services in neighborhoods across the five boroughs. The vitality, diversity and longevity of small, local businesses are critical to the City’s economy and provide important benefits to residents of the City’s neighborhoods. For example, in 2014, businesses in NYC’s lower income neighborhoods employed 113,420 workers below the age of 30, a 31% increase from 2002.

Over the last fifteen years, the New York City Department of Small Business Services (DSBS) has administered programs to educate and support tens of thousands of local businesses and entrepreneurs seeking to conduct business in New York City. Recently, DSBS has responded to a growing demand to assist commercial tenants in understanding the content of their current or proposed leases, negotiating with landlords and resisting harassment. In addition, DSBS and governmental partners including the Department of City Planning, the Department of Housing Preservation and Development, the New York City Council, and the City’s Economic Development Corporation have worked to devise programs and policy interventions to support the survival of independent brick and mortar businesses and the vitality and safety of the commercial corridors in neighborhoods across the City. Interventions by these government partners have included restricting street frontage for banks and other less vulnerable business types through zoning amendments, passing legislation extending anti-harassment protections to commercial tenants, incentivizing affordable housing developers to include appropriate spaces for small business tenants on the ground floor of new developments and investing in improvements to commercial corridors.

DSBS proposes to establish the Love Your Local Small Business Grant Program to expand the City’s economic development toolkit. This three-year pilot program will allow the City to develop and test interventions designed to help local, small businesses remain viable and stable participants in the lives of the City’s diverse neighborhoods despite changes in local real estate conditions. Devising these solutions is important, as 2016 data published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that job creation attributable to new establishments has been on a decline since the late 1990s and that businesses established prior to 1993 employ nearly 40% of the private sector workforce. Therefore, supporting existing, neighborhood businesses in making changes to allow them to survive and grow is an efficient means of supporting neighborhood economic well-being.

The Love Your Local Small Business Grant Program will incentivize commercial tenant businesses to share detailed information on challenges related to the costs of their leases with DSBS. DSBS will support a carefully selected set of those businesses in addressing those challenges through expert advice and implementation funding. DSBS will collect performance data from the businesses following these interventions, thus increasing the City’s understanding of what strategies are effective in preventing neighborhood businesses from closing due to rising rents and other rising real estate costs. This understanding will increase DSBS’ ability to provide meaningful advice and assistance to other businesses committed to retaining local jobs, helping to ensure the continued availability of locally valued goods and services, and preserving retail diversity. The Love Your Local Small Business Grant Program builds on the work of Small Business First, a DSBS program which invests in initiatives to help existing businesses thrive by connecting them to resources that will save them time and money.

Subject: 

Rules Governing Love Your Local Grant Program

Location: 
110 William Street 7th Floor
New York, NY
Contact: 

No contact

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

NOTICE OF ADOPTION

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN PURSUANT TO THE AUTHORITY VESTED IN the

Commissioner of the Department of Small Business Services (the “Commissioner”) pursuant to

section 1301 of the New York City Charter and in accordance with the provisions of section

1043 of the New York City Charter that the Department of Small Business Services promulgates

and adopts Subchapter F of Title 66 of the Rules of the City of New York to govern the

administration of a program that provides grants to companies that provide school bus

transportation in order to encourage such companies to maintain the wages and benefits of those

employees who have had prior experience in the industry.

 

Written comments regarding the rules were received in accordance with the notice published in

the City Record on October 13, 2017 or electronically through NYC RULES at

www.nyc.gov/nycrules. A public hearing was held on November 15, 2017.

 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Rule

During the 2014-15, 2015-16, and 2016-17 school years, the Department of Small Business Services (DSBS) administered a grant program to support the employment of experienced school bus workers who have been impacted by changes in the Department of Education’s (DOE) contracts for school bus transportation.  Pursuant to the authority vested in DSBS by New York City Charter § 1301, DSBS is proposing a rule that would continue the grant program for the 2017-18 school year.

Since 1979, following a school bus strike, DOE’s school bus contracts included employee protection provisions (EPPs) requiring school transportation contractors, among other things, to give priority in hiring to employees who became unemployed because of their employers’ loss of DOE bus contract work and to pay such employees the same wages and benefits they had received prior to becoming unemployed.

Following the 2011 decision by the New York State Court of Appeals in L&M Bus Corp., et al., v. the New York City Department of Education, et al. (L&M), DOE did not include EPPs or similar provisions in solicitations for its school bus contracts. After the issuance of the first such post-L&M solicitation, there was a school bus strike in January and February of 2013. 

 

DSBS’s grant program, created by Local Law 44 of 2014, was designed to encourage school bus contractors providing transportation services to DOE to maintain the wages and benefits of those employees who had prior experience in the industry.  The 2014-15, 2015-16 and 2016-17 grant programs successfully supported the employment of approximately 1200 school bus workers.  This proposed rule continues the school bus employee grant program for the 2017-18 school year.

Effective Date: 
Sat, 01/13/2018

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments

Agency:
Comment By: 
Friday, November 17, 2017
Proposed Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose

During the 2014-15, 2015-16, and 2016-17 school years, the Department of Small Business Services (DSBS) administered a grant program to support the employment of experienced school bus workers who have been impacted by changes in the Department of Education’s (DOE) contracts for school bus transportation.  Pursuant to the authority vested in DSBS by New York City Charter § 1301, DSBS is proposing a rule that would continue the grant program for the 2017-18 school year.

 

Since 1979, following a school bus strike, DOE’s school bus contracts included employee protection provisions (EPPs) requiring school transportation contractors, among other things, to give priority in hiring to employees who became unemployed because of their employers’ loss of DOE bus contract work and to pay such employees the same wages and benefits they had received prior to becoming unemployed.

 

Following the 2011 decision by the New York State Court of Appeals in L&M Bus Corp., et al., v. the New York City Department of Education, et al. (L&M), DOE did not include EPPs or similar provisions in solicitations for its school bus contracts. After the issuance of the first such post-L&M solicitation, there was a school bus strike in January and February of 2013. 

 

DSBS’s grant program, created by Local Law 44 of 2014, was designed to encourage school bus contractors providing transportation services to DOE to maintain the wages and benefits of those employees who had prior experience in the industry.  The 2014-15, 2015-16 and 2016-17 grant programs successfully supported the employment of approximately 1200 school bus workers.  This proposed rule continues the school bus employee grant program for the 2017-18 school year.

Subject: 

Continuation of School Bus Grant Program

Location: 
New York City Department of Small Business Services 7th Floor
110 William Street
New York, NY 10038
Contact: 

No contact

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