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Department of Small Business Services
Codified Title: 
Title 66: Department of Small Business Services

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose

New York City is home to more than 200,000 small businesses that collectively employ more than half of the City’s private sector workforce and provide needed jobs, goods and services in neighborhoods across the five boroughs. The vitality, diversity and longevity of small, local businesses are critical to the City’s economy and provide important benefits to residents of the City’s neighborhoods. For example, in 2014, businesses in NYC’s lower income neighborhoods employed 113,420 workers below the age of 30, a 31% increase from 2002.

Over the last fifteen years, the New York City Department of Small Business Services (DSBS) has administered programs to educate and support tens of thousands of local businesses and entrepreneurs seeking to conduct business in New York City. Recently, DSBS has responded to a growing demand to assist commercial tenants in understanding the content of their current or proposed leases, negotiating with landlords and resisting harassment. In addition, DSBS and governmental partners including the Department of City Planning, the Department of Housing Preservation and Development, the New York City Council, and the City’s Economic Development Corporation have worked to devise programs and policy interventions to support the survival of independent brick and mortar businesses and the vitality and safety of the commercial corridors in neighborhoods across the City. Interventions by these government partners have included restricting street frontage for banks and other less vulnerable business types through zoning amendments, passing legislation extending anti-harassment protections to commercial tenants, incentivizing affordable housing developers to include appropriate spaces for small business tenants on the ground floor of new developments and investing in improvements to commercial corridors.

DSBS establishes the Love Your Local Small Business Grant Program to expand the City’s economic development toolkit. This three-year pilot program will allow the City to develop and test interventions designed to help local, small businesses remain viable and stable participants in the lives of the City’s diverse neighborhoods despite changes in local real estate conditions. Devising these solutions is important, as 2016 data published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that job creation attributable to new establishments has been on a decline since the late 1990s and that businesses established prior to 1993 employ nearly 40% of the private sector workforce. Therefore, supporting existing, neighborhood businesses in making changes to allow them to survive and grow is an efficient means of supporting neighborhood economic well-being.

The Love Your Local Small Business Grant Program will incentivize commercial tenant businesses to share detailed information on challenges related to the costs of their leases with DSBS. DSBS will support a carefully selected set of those businesses in addressing those challenges through expert advice and implementation funding. DSBS will collect performance data from the businesses following these interventions, thus increasing the City’s understanding of what strategies are effective in preventing neighborhood businesses from closing due to rising rents and other rising real estate costs. This understanding will increase DSBS’ ability to provide meaningful advice and assistance to other businesses committed to retaining local jobs, helping to ensure the continued availability of locally valued goods and services, and preserving retail diversity. The Love Your Local Small Business Grant Program builds on the work of Small Business First, a DSBS program which invests in initiatives to help existing businesses thrive by connecting them to resources that will save them time and money.

Effective Date: 
Sat, 07/21/2018

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments

Agency:
Comment By: 
Tuesday, May 29, 2018
Proposed Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose

New York City is home to more than 200,000 small businesses that collectively employ more than half of the City’s private sector workforce and provide needed jobs, goods and services in neighborhoods across the five boroughs. The vitality, diversity and longevity of small, local businesses are critical to the City’s economy and provide important benefits to residents of the City’s neighborhoods. For example, in 2014, businesses in NYC’s lower income neighborhoods employed 113,420 workers below the age of 30, a 31% increase from 2002.

Over the last fifteen years, the New York City Department of Small Business Services (DSBS) has administered programs to educate and support tens of thousands of local businesses and entrepreneurs seeking to conduct business in New York City. Recently, DSBS has responded to a growing demand to assist commercial tenants in understanding the content of their current or proposed leases, negotiating with landlords and resisting harassment. In addition, DSBS and governmental partners including the Department of City Planning, the Department of Housing Preservation and Development, the New York City Council, and the City’s Economic Development Corporation have worked to devise programs and policy interventions to support the survival of independent brick and mortar businesses and the vitality and safety of the commercial corridors in neighborhoods across the City. Interventions by these government partners have included restricting street frontage for banks and other less vulnerable business types through zoning amendments, passing legislation extending anti-harassment protections to commercial tenants, incentivizing affordable housing developers to include appropriate spaces for small business tenants on the ground floor of new developments and investing in improvements to commercial corridors.

DSBS proposes to establish the Love Your Local Small Business Grant Program to expand the City’s economic development toolkit. This three-year pilot program will allow the City to develop and test interventions designed to help local, small businesses remain viable and stable participants in the lives of the City’s diverse neighborhoods despite changes in local real estate conditions. Devising these solutions is important, as 2016 data published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that job creation attributable to new establishments has been on a decline since the late 1990s and that businesses established prior to 1993 employ nearly 40% of the private sector workforce. Therefore, supporting existing, neighborhood businesses in making changes to allow them to survive and grow is an efficient means of supporting neighborhood economic well-being.

The Love Your Local Small Business Grant Program will incentivize commercial tenant businesses to share detailed information on challenges related to the costs of their leases with DSBS. DSBS will support a carefully selected set of those businesses in addressing those challenges through expert advice and implementation funding. DSBS will collect performance data from the businesses following these interventions, thus increasing the City’s understanding of what strategies are effective in preventing neighborhood businesses from closing due to rising rents and other rising real estate costs. This understanding will increase DSBS’ ability to provide meaningful advice and assistance to other businesses committed to retaining local jobs, helping to ensure the continued availability of locally valued goods and services, and preserving retail diversity. The Love Your Local Small Business Grant Program builds on the work of Small Business First, a DSBS program which invests in initiatives to help existing businesses thrive by connecting them to resources that will save them time and money.

Subject: 

Rules Governing Love Your Local Grant Program

Location: 
110 William Street 7th Floor
New York, NY
Contact: 

No contact

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

NOTICE OF ADOPTION

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN PURSUANT TO THE AUTHORITY VESTED IN the

Commissioner of the Department of Small Business Services (the “Commissioner”) pursuant to

section 1301 of the New York City Charter and in accordance with the provisions of section

1043 of the New York City Charter that the Department of Small Business Services promulgates

and adopts Subchapter F of Title 66 of the Rules of the City of New York to govern the

administration of a program that provides grants to companies that provide school bus

transportation in order to encourage such companies to maintain the wages and benefits of those

employees who have had prior experience in the industry.

 

Written comments regarding the rules were received in accordance with the notice published in

the City Record on October 13, 2017 or electronically through NYC RULES at

www.nyc.gov/nycrules. A public hearing was held on November 15, 2017.

 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Rule

During the 2014-15, 2015-16, and 2016-17 school years, the Department of Small Business Services (DSBS) administered a grant program to support the employment of experienced school bus workers who have been impacted by changes in the Department of Education’s (DOE) contracts for school bus transportation.  Pursuant to the authority vested in DSBS by New York City Charter § 1301, DSBS is proposing a rule that would continue the grant program for the 2017-18 school year.

Since 1979, following a school bus strike, DOE’s school bus contracts included employee protection provisions (EPPs) requiring school transportation contractors, among other things, to give priority in hiring to employees who became unemployed because of their employers’ loss of DOE bus contract work and to pay such employees the same wages and benefits they had received prior to becoming unemployed.

Following the 2011 decision by the New York State Court of Appeals in L&M Bus Corp., et al., v. the New York City Department of Education, et al. (L&M), DOE did not include EPPs or similar provisions in solicitations for its school bus contracts. After the issuance of the first such post-L&M solicitation, there was a school bus strike in January and February of 2013. 

 

DSBS’s grant program, created by Local Law 44 of 2014, was designed to encourage school bus contractors providing transportation services to DOE to maintain the wages and benefits of those employees who had prior experience in the industry.  The 2014-15, 2015-16 and 2016-17 grant programs successfully supported the employment of approximately 1200 school bus workers.  This proposed rule continues the school bus employee grant program for the 2017-18 school year.

Effective Date: 
Sat, 01/13/2018

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments

Agency:
Comment By: 
Friday, November 17, 2017
Proposed Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose

During the 2014-15, 2015-16, and 2016-17 school years, the Department of Small Business Services (DSBS) administered a grant program to support the employment of experienced school bus workers who have been impacted by changes in the Department of Education’s (DOE) contracts for school bus transportation.  Pursuant to the authority vested in DSBS by New York City Charter § 1301, DSBS is proposing a rule that would continue the grant program for the 2017-18 school year.

 

Since 1979, following a school bus strike, DOE’s school bus contracts included employee protection provisions (EPPs) requiring school transportation contractors, among other things, to give priority in hiring to employees who became unemployed because of their employers’ loss of DOE bus contract work and to pay such employees the same wages and benefits they had received prior to becoming unemployed.

 

Following the 2011 decision by the New York State Court of Appeals in L&M Bus Corp., et al., v. the New York City Department of Education, et al. (L&M), DOE did not include EPPs or similar provisions in solicitations for its school bus contracts. After the issuance of the first such post-L&M solicitation, there was a school bus strike in January and February of 2013. 

 

DSBS’s grant program, created by Local Law 44 of 2014, was designed to encourage school bus contractors providing transportation services to DOE to maintain the wages and benefits of those employees who had prior experience in the industry.  The 2014-15, 2015-16 and 2016-17 grant programs successfully supported the employment of approximately 1200 school bus workers.  This proposed rule continues the school bus employee grant program for the 2017-18 school year.

Subject: 

Continuation of School Bus Grant Program

Location: 
New York City Department of Small Business Services 7th Floor
110 William Street
New York, NY 10038
Contact: 

No contact

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Rule

Chapter 6 of Title 66 of the New York City Rules outlines the Industry Ownership Program (the “Program”). This Program provided grants to certain industry groups to pay for eligible expenses in acquiring and renovating a building. Applications must have been submitted by the close of business on April 28, 1989. Therefore, because this Program no longer exists, the Department is proposing to repeal the rules.

Chapter 7 of Title 66 of the New York City Rules outlines the Industrial Security Grant Program (the “Program”). The Program provided grants to eligible industrial businesses to purchase security equipment. This Program no longer exists; therefore, the Department is proposing to repeal the rules.

Chapter 8 of Title 66 of the New York City Rules outlines the Commercial Security Grant Program (the “Program”). The Program provided grants to commercial businesses for the costs of purchasing and installing security equipment. The Program was part of New York City's commercial business retention effort. The program was designed to enable groups of commercial businesses in selected low and moderate income neighborhoods located in designated areas to obtain technical assistance provided by the Department and the New York City Police Department for proven, cost effective crime prevention techniques to reduce burglary, robbery, pilferage, and other threats to property and personal safety within the premises of participating merchants and in areas where participating merchants and other commercial businesses were located. This Program no longer exists; therefore, the Department is proposing to repeal the rules.

Chapter 9 of Title 66 of the New York City Rules outlines the Energy Services pursuant to Local Law No. 49 of 1987 (the “Program”). The Program provided a benefit to electricity redistributors who purchased electricity from a utility or any other person, corporation or other entity and on a metered or unmetered basis, resold or otherwise redistributed for any consideration such electricity to a non-residential energy user. This Program no longer exists; therefore, the Department is proposing to repeal the rules.

Working with the City’s rulemaking agencies, the Law Department, and the Office of Management and Budget, the Office of Operations conducted a retrospective rules review of the City’s existing rules, identifying those rules that will be repealed or modified to reduce regulatory burdens, increase equity, support small businesses, and simplify and update content to help support public understanding and compliance. This proposed rule repeal was identified through this initiative.

Effective Date: 
Mon, 06/05/2017

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

 

Statement of Basis and Purpose

During the 2014-15 and 2015-16 school years, the Department of Small Business Services (DSBS) administered a grant program to support the employment of experienced school bus workers who have been impacted by changes in the Department of Education’s (DOE) contracts for school bus transportation.  Pursuant to the authority vested in DSBS by New York City Charter § 1301, DSBS is proposing a rule that would continue the grant program for the 2016-17 school year.

Since 1979, following a school bus strike, DOE’s school bus contracts included employee protection provisions (EPPs) requiring school transportation contractors, among other things, to give priority in hiring to employees who became unemployed because of their employers’ loss of DOE bus contract work and to pay such employees the same wages and benefits they had received prior to becoming unemployed.

Following the 2011 decision by the New York State Court of Appeals in L&M Bus Corp., et al., v. the New York City Department of Education, et al. (L&M), DOE did not include EPPs or similar provisions in solicitations for its school bus contracts. After the issuance of the first such post-L&M solicitation, there was a school bus strike in January and February of 2013. 

DSBS’s grant program, created by Local Law 44 of 2014, was designed to encourage school bus contractors providing transportation services to DOE to maintain the wages and benefits of those employees who had prior experience in the industry.  The 2014-15 and 2015-16 grant programs successfully supported the employment of approximately 1200 school bus workers.  This proposed rule continues the school bus employee grant program for the 2016-17 school year.

Effective Date: 
Mon, 04/10/2017

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments

Agency:
Comment By: 
Thursday, April 6, 2017
Proposed Rules Content: 

 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Proposed Rule

Chapter 6 of Title 66 of the New York City Rules outlines the Industry Ownership Program (the “Program”). This Program provided grants to certain industry groups to pay for eligible expenses in acquiring and renovating a building. Applications must have been submitted by the close of business on April 28, 1989. Therefore, because this Program no longer exists, the Department is proposing to repeal the rules.

Chapter 7 of Title 66 of the New York City Rules outlines the Industrial Security Grant Program (the “Program”). The Program provided grants to eligible industrial businesses to purchase security equipment. This Program no longer exists; therefore, the Department is proposing to repeal the rules.

Chapter 8 of Title 66 of the New York City Rules outlines the Commercial Security Grant Program (the “Program”). The Program provided grants to commercial businesses for the costs of purchasing and installing security equipment. The Program was part of New York City's commercial business retention effort. The program was designed to enable groups of commercial businesses in selected low and moderate income neighborhoods located in designated areas to obtain technical assistance provided by the Department and the New York City Police Department for proven, cost effective crime prevention techniques to reduce burglary, robbery, pilferage, and other threats to property and personal safety within the premises of participating merchants and in areas where participating merchants and other commercial businesses were located. This Program no longer exists; therefore, the Department is proposing to repeal the rules.

Chapter 9 of Title 66 of the New York City Rules outlines the Energy Services pursuant to Local Law No. 49 of 1987 (the “Program”). The Program provided a benefit to electricity redistributors who purchased electricity from a utility or any other person, corporation or other entity and on a metered or unmetered basis, resold or otherwise redistributed for any consideration such electricity to a non-residential energy user. This Program no longer exists; therefore, the Department is proposing to repeal the rules.

Working with the City’s rulemaking agencies, the Law Department, and the Office of Management and Budget, the Office of Operations conducted a retrospective rules review of the City’s existing rules, identifying those rules that will be repealed or modified to reduce regulatory burdens, increase equity, support small businesses, and simplify and update content to help support public understanding and compliance. This proposed rule repeal was identified through this initiative.

Small Business Service’s authority for these rules is found in section 1043 and 1301 of the New York City Charter.

Subject: 

Repeal of Expired Rules

Location: 
Download Copy of Proposed Rule (.pdf): 

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments

Agency:
Comment By: 
Tuesday, January 31, 2017
Proposed Rules Content: 

 Statement of Basis and Purpose

  During the 2014-15 and 2015-16 school years, the Department of Small Business Services (DSBS) administered a grant program to support the employment of experienced school bus workers who have been impacted by changes in the Department of Education’s (DOE) contracts for school bus transportation.  Pursuant to the authority vested in DSBS by New York City Charter § 1301, DSBS is proposing a rule that would continue the grant program for the 2016-17 school year.

  Since 1979, following a school bus strike, DOE’s school bus contracts included employee protection provisions (EPPs) requiring school transportation contractors, among other things, to give priority in hiring to employees who became unemployed because of their employers’ loss of DOE bus contract work and to pay such employees the same wages and benefits they had received prior to becoming unemployed.

  Following the 2011 decision by the New York State Court of Appeals in L&M Bus Corp., et al., v. the New York City Department of Education, et al. (L&M), DOE did not include EPPs or similar provisions in solicitations for its school bus contracts. After the issuance of the first such post-L&M solicitation, there was a school bus strike in January and February of 2013. 

            DSBS’s grant program, created by Local Law 44 of 2014, was designed to encourage school bus contractors providing transportation services to DOE to maintain the wages and benefits of those employees who had prior experience in the industry.  The 2014-15 and 2015-16 grant programs successfully supported the employment of approximately 1200 school bus workers.  This proposed rule continues the school bus employee grant program for the 2016-17 school year.

 

Subject: 

Extension of School Bus Drivers Grant Program

Location: 
110 William Street (7th Floor)
New York, NY 10038
Download Copy of Proposed Rule (.pdf): 

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

 

Statement of Basis and Purpose

The Department of Small Business Services (“DSBS”) supports and administers programs designed to benefit neighborhood commercial streets, industrial areas and other economic centers. Since the late 1970’s, DSBS has administered commercial revitalization grants for nonprofit organizations to carry out neighborhood revitalization and community economic development, planning and capacity building activities and services, such as planning, administration, economic development, public services, non-profit organization capacity building, and public facility improvements.

DSBS is promulgating a rule to establish a new program - the Neighborhood 360 Grant Program - to support the economic vitality of commercial districts across New York City by directly addressing locally identified community development needs.   The Neighborhood 360 program will support the Mayor’s Housing Plan, which calls for a denser city with a better plan for growth through investments in both infrastructure and services that will make neighborhoods more livable.  Specifically, the Neighborhood 360 program would support the Mayor’s Housing Plan by working directly with local stakeholders to assess commercial district needs and providing necessary funding to nonprofit organizations to develop and deliver services that will protect a neighborhood’s small business character while improving the collective commercial climate and quality of life to better serve a growing community.

Neighborhood 360 grants will fund commercial revitalization projects located in geographic areas identified by DSBS and could include: neighborhood beautification projects, supplemental sanitation and public safety services, public space activation/maintenance/management, branding/marketing campaigns, production and coordination of local events, business improvement district planning, merchant organizing, retail recruitment strategy development, minor physical improvements to the public realm, neighborhood planning, organizational development, and general program administration.

“Shall” and “must” denote mandatory requirements and may be used interchangeably in the rules of this department, unless otherwise specified or unless the context clearly indicates otherwise.

Effective Date: 
Mon, 08/29/2016

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments

Agency:
Comment By: 
Friday, July 15, 2016
Proposed Rules Content: 

 Statement of Basis and Purpose

The Department of Small Business Services (“DSBS”) supports and administers programs designed to benefit neighborhood commercial streets, industrial areas and other economic centers. Since the late 1970’s, DSBS has administered commercial revitalization grants for nonprofit organizations to carry out neighborhood revitalization and community economic development, planning and capacity building activities and services, such as planning, administration, economic development, public services, non-profit organization capacity building, and public facility improvements.

DSBS is proposing a rule to establish a new program - the Neighborhood 360 Grant Program - to support the economic vitality of commercial districts across New York City by directly addressing locally identified community development needs.   The Neighborhood 360 program will support the Mayor’s Housing Plan, which calls for a denser city with a better plan for growth through investments in both infrastructure and services that will make neighborhoods more livable.  Specifically, the Neighborhood 360 program would support the Mayor’s Housing Plan by working directly with local stakeholders to assess commercial district needs and providing necessary funding to nonprofit organizations to develop and deliver services that will protect a neighborhood’s small business character while improving the collective commercial climate and quality of life to better serve a growing community.

           Neighborhood 360 grants will fund commercial revitalization projects located in geographic areas identified by DSBS and could include: neighborhood beautification projects, supplemental sanitation and public safety services, public space activation/maintenance/management, branding/marketing campaigns, production and coordination of local events, business improvement district planning, merchant organizing, retail recruitment strategy development, minor physical improvements to the public realm, neighborhood planning, organizational development, and general program administration.

          “Shall” and “must” denote mandatory requirements and may be used interchangeably in the rules of this department, unless otherwise specified or unless the context clearly indicates otherwise.

 

Subject: 

Neighborhood 360 Grant Program

Location: 
110 William Street (4th Floor hearing room)
New York, NY 10038
Download Copy of Proposed Rule (.pdf): 

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