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Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 
 
 

Statement of Basis and Purpose

Service Dog Tags

As part of a comprehensive review and update of the Health Code, on March 16, 2010, the Board of Health adopted several amendments to Article 161 of the Health Code.  The amendments included  adding a definition of the term “service dog” in section 161.02 and a new subdivision (d) in section 161.04 that authorized the Department to provide, at no additional cost, a second tag in addition to a regular license to the owner of a service dog.  Such tags were available in other parts of the State.  The amendments were intended to make them similarly available to people with disabilities residing in the City who might want to alert others that their dogs were service animals and thus should be allowed to accompany them.

            While the provisions of the Health Code allowing the Department to issue service dog tag were well-intentioned, their existence may actually be frustrating the purposes of the ADA[1] and New York State and City Human Rights Laws.[2] [3]  The ADA prohibits places of business or other public accommodation, landlords, and employers from discriminating against people with disabilities.  Such discrimination includes refusal to allow entrance of a service animal, which the ADA defines as any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with disabilities, without regard to whether the animal has a specific tag identifying it as a service dog.[4]  Because the Department offered the optional service dog tags, some entities are confused and mistakenly only accommodated individuals whose service dogs are wearing them.  Similarly, the Department was informed that some individuals with disabilities mistakenly believed they must have service dog tags in order to exercise their rights under the law.  Indeed, the ADA regulations specifically provide that a public accommodation or entity “shall not require documentation, such as proof that the animal has been certified, trained, or licensed as a service animal.”[5]  Thus, rather than facilitating compliance with disability laws, the tags may have impeded individuals from exercising their rights and might have inadvertently led a business to refuse service to a person with a disability whose dog did not have a tag.

         In order to remove the inadvertent barriers created by the service dog tag provision of the Health Code, the Board of Health is repealing the provision and remove the definition of “service dog” from Article 161 of the Health Code. The Mayor’s Office for People with Disabilities and the City Commission on Human Rights agree that the Department should stop issuing service dog tags because the tags are not necessary; both agencies are concerned that the tags could actually work to the disadvantage of people with disabilities and tend to confuse some business owners, leading them to unintentionally violate the ADA.

Simplifying language and other amendments

            The Mayor’s Office of Operations, working with the City’s rulemaking agencies, the Law Department, and the Office of Management and Budget, conducted a retrospective review of the Health Code and City rules to identify provisions that should be, among other possible changes, simplified to help support public understanding and compliance. The amendments to sections 161.15 and 161.17 were identified through this initiative. 

            As part of this text simplification process, the Board of Health is acting to alleviate confusion whether small animals may be sold, groomed, trained, or boarded in homes.  This confusion has arisen due to the use of the word “room” in Health Code section 161.15(a) rather than the word “dwelling.” The definition of “home occupation” in section 12-10 of the New York City Zoning Resolution[6] specifically provides that commercial animal kennels are not permitted as “home occupations.”  Health Code section 161.02 defines a “boarding kennel business” as a facility other than an animal shelter where animals not owned by the proprietor are sheltered, harbored, maintained, groomed, exercised, fed, or watered in return for a fee.  The Board is amending subdivision (a) of section 161.15 to replace the word “room” with the word “dwelling” and adding the phrase “in return for a fee” to clarify where the sale, boarding, grooming, and/or training of small animals for a fee is allowed.

Similarly, the other changes being made, except the following two amendments, improve clarity.  The two substantive changes are:

        1.     Changes to Health Code subdivision 161.15(d)

            Previously, subdivision (d) only prohibited the sale or holding for sale, boarding, grooming or training any dog or cat that has, or has been exposed to, a communicable disease.  The Board is replacing the phrase “a dog or cat” with “any animal” so that communicable disease among all types of animals can be better controlled and avoided.

         2.     Changes to Health Code section 161.17

            The Board is adding parasites communicable to other animals and humans to the conditions prohibited for dogs and cats in group socialization or play areas operated by permitted entities.  The goal of this addition is to better protect the health of animals and humans from communicable conditions.

Statutory Authority

The authority for these amendments is found in sections 556, 558, and 1043 of the Charter.  Section 556 of the Charter provides the Department with jurisdiction to protect and promote the health of all persons in the City of New York.  Section 558 of the Charter empowers the Board to amend the Health Code and to include in the Health Code all matters to which the authority of Department extends. Section 1043 grants the Department rulemaking authority. 




[1] Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, Pub. L. No. 101-336 (1990).

[2] NYS Executive Law § 290, et seq.; see §§ 296(2) and 296(14); NYS Civil Rights Law §§ 47 and 47-b.

[3] NYC Administrative Code § 8-107(4).

[4] 28 C.F.R. § 36.104; see also at § 35.104.  As noted recently by the New York City and State Bar Associations Joint Task Force on Service Animals in New York State (accessible online at http://documents.nycbar.org/files/guide-to-the-use-of-service-animals-in-new-york-state.html#_edn1), the New York City Human Rights Law does not define “service animal.”

[5] 28 C.F.R. § 36.302(c)(6); see also at § 35.136(f). 

Effective Date: 
Fri, 10/20/2017

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments

Agency:
Comment By: 
Monday, July 24, 2017
Proposed Rules Content: 
 

Statement of Basis and Purpose

Service Dog Tags

As part of a comprehensive review and update of the Health Code, on March 16, 2010, the Board of Health adopted several amendments to Article 161 of the Health Code.  The amendments included  adding a definition of the term “service dog” in section 161.02 and a new subdivision (d) in section 161.04 that authorizes the Department to provide, at an additional cost, a second tag in addition to a regular license to the owner of a service dog.  Such tags were available in other parts of the State.  The amendments were intended to make them similarly available to people with disabilities residing in the City who might want to alert others that their dogs were service animals and thus should be allowed to accompany them.

             While the provisions of the Health Code allowing the Department to issue service dog tags were well-intentioned, their existence may actually be frustrating the purposes of the ADA[1] and New York State and City Human Rights Laws.[2][3]  The ADA prohibits places of business or other public accommodation, landlords, and employers from discriminating against people with disabilities.  Such discrimination includes refusal to allow entrance of a service animal, which the ADA defines as any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with disabilities, without regard to whether the animal has a specific tag identifying it as a service dog.[4]  Because the Department offers the optional service dog tags, some entities are confused and mistakenly only accommodate individuals whose service dogs are wearing them.  Similarly, the Department has been informed that some individuals with disabilities mistakenly believe they must have service dog tags in order to exercise their rights under the law.  Indeed, the ADA regulations specifically provide that a public accommodation or entity “shall not require documentation, such as proof that the animal has been certified, trained, or licensed as a service animal.”[5]  Thus, rather than facilitating compliance with disability laws, the tags may impede individuals from exercising their rights and might inadvertently lead a business to refuse service to a person with a disability whose dog does not have a tag.

   In order to remove the inadvertent barriers created by the service dog tag provision of the Health Code, the Department therefore proposes that the Board of Health repeal the provision and remove the definition of “service dog” from Article 161 of the Health Code. The Mayor’s Office for People with Disabilities and the City Commission on Human Rights agree that the Department should stop issuing service dog tags because the tags are not necessary; both agencies are concerned that the tags could actually work to the disadvantage of people with disabilities and tend to confuse some business owners, leading them to unintentionally violate the ADA.

 Simplifying language and other amendments

 

            The Mayor’s Office of Operations, working with the City’s rulemaking agencies, the Law Department, and the Office of Management and Budget, conducted a retrospective review of the City’s rules to identify rules that should be, among other possible changes, simplified to help support public understanding and compliance. The proposed amendments to sections 161.15 and 161.17 were identified through this initiative. 

             As part of this text simplification process, the Department proposes to alleviate confusion whether small animals may be sold, groomed, trained, or boarded in homes.  This confusion has arisen due to the use of the word “room” in Health Code subdivision 161.15(a) rather than the word “dwelling.” The definition of “home occupation” in section 12-10 of the New York City Zoning Resolution[6] specifically provides that commercial animal kennels are not permitted as “home occupations.”  Health Code section 161.02 defines a “boarding kennel business” as a facility other than an animal shelter where animals not owned by the proprietor are sheltered, harbored, maintained, groomed, exercised, fed, or watered in return for a fee.  The Department therefore proposes that the Board amend subdivision 161.15(a) to replace the word “room” with the word “dwelling” and adding the phrase “in return for a fee” to clarify where the sale, boarding, grooming, and/or training of small animals for a fee is allowed.

Similarly, the other changes in this proposed rule, except the following two amendments, would improve clarity.  The two substantive changes being proposed are:

     1.     Proposed changes to Health Code subdivision 161.15(d)

            Currently, subdivision (d) only prohibits the sale or holding for sale, boarding, grooming or training any dog or cat that has, or has been exposed to, a communicable disease.  The Department proposes the Board replace the phrase “a dog or cat” with “any animal” so that communicable disease among all types of animals can be better controlled and avoided.

     2.     Proposed changes to Health Code section 161.17

            The Department proposes that the Board add parasites communicable to other animals and humans to the conditions prohibited for dogs and cats in group socialization or play areas operated by permitted entities.  The goal of this addition is to better protect the health of animals and humans from communicable conditions.

Statutory Authority

            These amendments to the Health Code are promulgated pursuant to Sections 558 and 1043 of the New York City Charter.  Section 558 of the Charter empowers the Board to amend the Health Code and to include in the Health Code all matters to which the authority of Department extends. Section 1043 grants the Department rulemaking authority. 

 




[1] Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, Pub. L. No. 101-336 (1990).

[2] NYS Executive Law § 290, et seq.; see §§ 296(2) and 296(14); NYS Civil Rights Law §§ 47 and 47-b.

[3] NYC Administrative Code § 8-107(4).

[4] 28 C.F.R. § 36.104; see also at § 35.104.  As noted recently by the New York City and State Bar Associations Joint Task Force on Service Animals in New York State (accessible online at http://documents.nycbar.org/files/guide-to-the-use-of-service-animals-in-new-york-state.html#_edn1), the New York City Human Rights Law does not define “service animal.”

 

[5] 28 C.F.R. § 36.302(c)(6); see also at § 35.136(f). 

Subject: 

Proposed resolution to amend Article 161 (Animals) of the New York City Health Code regarding service tags for animals.

Location: 
New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Gotham Center
42-09 28th Street, 3rd Floor, Room 3-32
Queens, NY 11101
Contact: 

Svetlana Burdeynik at (347) 396-6078 or resolutioncomments@health.nyc.gov

Download Copy of Proposed Rule (.pdf): 

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 
 

Statement of Basis and Purpose

 Amendment of Article 161 relating to animal nuisances

The Department’s Bureau of Veterinary and Pest Control Services enforces Health Code Article 161 concerning the control of animals in the City.  Section 161.03(a) of Article 161 previously required that pet owners control their pets so that they do not “commit a nuisance on a sidewalk of any public place, on a floor, wall, stairway or roof of any public or private premises used in common by the public, or on a fence, wall or stairway of a building abutting on a public place.”

The Board now clarifies that this provision applies to any area used in common by the public, regardless of whether it is publicly or privately owned.   

 Statutory Authority

These amendments to Article 161of the New York City Health Code are authorized by sections 556, 558 and 1043 of the New York City Charter.  Section 556(c)(2) authorizes the Department to exercise control over and supervise the abatement of nuisances affecting or likely to affect the public health.  Sections 558(b) and (c) of the Charter empower the Board of Health to amend the Health Code and to include in the Health Code all matters to which the Department’s authority extends. Section 1043 grants the Department rulemaking authority. 

 

 

Effective Date: 
Fri, 10/21/2016

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments (View Public Comments Received:2)

Agency:
Comment By: 
Tuesday, July 26, 2016
Proposed Rules Content: 
 

Statement of Basis and Purpose

 

             The Department’s Bureau of Veterinary and Pest Control Services enforces Health Code Article 161 pertaining to the control of animals in the City.  Section 161.03(a) of Article 161 currently requires that pet owners control their pets so that they do not commit a nuisance on a “sidewalk of any public place, on a floor, wall, stairway or roof of any public or private premises used in common by the public, or on a fence, wall or stairway of a building abutting on a public place.”

             A question arose recently as to whether the provision applies to sidewalks and lawns in large residential communities in the City that are open to and used by the public as well as the residents of the local community. The Department is asking the Board to clarify that this provision applies to any area used in common, outdoor or indoor and regardless of whether it is publicly or privately owned.  

Statutory Authority

             These amendments to the New York City Health Code (the Health Code) are authorized by sections 558 and 1043 of the New York City Charter (the Charter).  Sections 558(b) and (c) of the Charter empower the Board of Health (the Board) to amend the Health Code and to include in the Health Code all matters to which the authority of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (the Department) extends. Section 1043 grants the Department rulemaking authority. 

 

 

Subject: 

Proposed resolution to amend Article 161 (Animals) to clarify applicability of section 161.03 of the New York City Health Code.

Location: 
New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Gotham Center
42-09 28th Street 14th Floor, Room 14-43
Queens, NY 11101
Contact: 

Svetlana Burdeynik at (347) 396-6078 or resolutioncomments@health.nyc.gov

Download Copy of Proposed Rule (.pdf): 

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 


Statement of Basis and Purpose

 

Statutory Authority

These amendments to the New York City Health Code (the “Health Code”) are authorized by sections 558 and 1043 of the New York City Charter (the “Charter”).  Sections 558(b) and (c) of the Charter empower the Board of Health (the “Board”) to amend the Health Code and to include in the Health Code all matters to which the authority of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (the “Department”) extends. Section 1043 grants the Department rulemaking authority. 

 

Background

 

The Department’s Bureau of Veterinary and Pest Control Services enforces Health Code Article 161 pertaining to the control of animals in the City.  Article 161 currently requires pet shops other than those selling dogs and cats to have permits and to comply with other provisions of the Health Code.  The N.Y. State Agriculture and Markets Law Article 26-A (“Care of Animals by Pet Dealers”) formerly prohibited local regulation of “pet dealers,” defined in such State law as an entity that sells more than nine animals (dogs and/or cats) to the public per year. See Agriculture and Markets Law §§400 subdivisions (1) and (4) and 400-a.  Effective January 10, 2014, this law was amended and a new §407 authorizes local regulation of these entities, provided that the local law is no less stringent than Article 26-A or effectively results in banning of all sales of dogs or cats “raised and maintained in a healthy and safe manner.”

 

On January 17, 2015, Local Law 5 of 2015 was enacted, and on June 2, 2015 was further amended by Local Law 53. Read together, Title 17 of the New York City Administrative Code now authorizes the Department to regulate pet shops selling dogs and cats, and Administrative Code § 17-372 requires such pet shops to hold permits issued by the Commissioner of the Department.  The law was to have become effective June 1, 2015, but was stayed on that date as a result of a challenge in the U.S. Court for the Eastern District of New York by certain pet shops and animal dealers. On October 20, 2015 it was upheld by the court and is therefore now in effect. An appeal filed after publication of the notice of intention to amend the Health Code is currently pending.   

 

The Board of Health is amending provisions of Article 161 that explicitly state that they are not applicable to sales of dogs and cats by pet dealers regulated under Article 26-A of the Agriculture and Markets Law, since pet shops selling these animals are again being regulated by the Department.  Pet shops selling only animals other than dogs and/or cats continue to be regulated by the Department and none of these amendments substantively affect those pet shops. In conjunction with these amendments, the permit fees and expiration dates set forth in Health Code Article 5 are also amended to be consistent with the fees set forth in the new Administrative Code  §17-374.

 

Effective Date: 
Mon, 07/18/2016

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments

Agency:
Comment By: 
Tuesday, May 10, 2016
Proposed Rules Content: 
 

Statement of Basis and Purpose

 

Statutory Authority

 

These amendments to the New York City Health Code (the Health Code) are authorized by sections 558 and 1043 of the New York City Charter (the Charter).  Sections 558(b) and (c) of the Charter empower the Board of Health (the Board) to amend the Health Code and to include in the Health Code all matters to which the authority of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (the Department) extends. Section 1043 grants the Department rulemaking authority. 

Background

The Department’s Bureau of Veterinary and Pest Control Services enforces Health Code Article 161 pertaining to the control of animals in the City.  Article 161 currently requires pet shops other than those selling dogs and cats to have permits and to comply with other provisions of the Health Code.  The N.Y. State Agriculture and Markets Law Article 26-A (“Care of Animals by Pet Dealers”) formerly prohibited local regulation of “pet dealers,” defined in such State law as an entity that sells more than nine animals (dogs and/or cats) to the public per year. See Agriculture and Markets Law §§400 subdivisions (1) and (4) and 400-a.  Effective January 10, 2014, this law was amended and a new §407 authorizes local regulation of these entities, provided that the local law is no less stringent than Article 26-A or effectively results in banning of all sales of dogs or cats “raised and maintained in a healthy and safe manner.”

 

On January 17, 2015, Local Law 5 of 2015 was enacted, and on June 2, 2015 was further amended by Local Law 53. Read together, Title 17 of the New York City Administrative Code now authorizes the Department to regulate pet shops selling dogs and cats. As a result, Administrative Code § 17-372 requires such pet shops to hold permits issued by the Commissioner of the Department.  The law was supposed to have become effective June 1, 2015, but was stayed on that date as a result of a challenge in the U.S. Court for the Eastern District of New York by certain pet shops and animal dealers. On October 20, 2015 it was upheld by the court and is therefore now in effect.   

 

Amendments to Health Code Articles 5 and 161

 

The Department is requesting that the Board of Health amend those provisions of Article 161 that currently explicitly state that they are not applicable to sales of dogs and cats by pet dealers regulated under Article 26-A of the Agriculture and Markets Law, since pet shops selling these animals are again regulated by the Department.  Pet shops selling only animals other than dogs and/or cats continue to be regulated by the Department and none of the proposed changes would substantively affect those pet shops. In conjunction with these amendments, the Department is proposing that the permit fees and expiration dates set forth in Health Code Article 5 also be amended to be consistent with the fees set forth in the new Administrative Code  §17-374.

The resolution is as follows.

Shall and must denote mandatory requirements and may be used interchangeably.

 

 

Subject: 

Proposed resolution to amend Article 161(Animals) and Article 5 (Permits) of the New York City Health Code regarding pet shops.

Location: 
New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Gotham Center
42-09 28th Street 14th Floor, Room 14-43
Queens, NY 11101
Contact: 

Svetlana Burdeynik at (347) 396-6078 or resolutioncomments@health.nyc.gov

Download Copy of Proposed Rule (.pdf): 

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments (View Public Comments Received:95)

Agency:
Comment By: 
Wednesday, January 21, 2015
Proposed Rules Content: 

 

 

Statement of Basis and Purpose

 

 

Statutory Authority

 

These amendments to the New York City Health Code (the Health Code) are authorized by sections 558 and 1043 of the New York City Charter (the Charter).  Sections 558(b) and (c) of the Charter empower the Board of Health (the Board) to amend the Health Code and to include in the Health Code all matters to which the authority of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (the Department) extends. Section 1043 grants the Department rule-making authority. 

 

Background

 

In May 2014, the Commissioner of the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene granted a petition from an individual asking that the Board consider amending Article 161 to remove ferrets from the list of animals prohibited as pets in the City of New York.  This proposal would initiate the process of amending the Health Code and begin a public comment period on whether ferret ownership should be legalized. 

 

The Department’s Bureau of Veterinary and Pest Control Services enforces Article 161 pertaining to the control of animals in the City.  It requests that the Board of Health also amend various other provisions of Article 161 and Article 11 of the Health Code related to animal control.

 

Amendments to Health Code §161.01(a)—Circuses and Other Animal Exhibitions

 

Health Code §161.01 prohibits the possession of wild and other animals that present hazards to human health and safety.  Subdivision (a) allows for certain exceptions and requires permits for temporary exhibitions, displays and other uses of prohibited animals.  Circuses and wildlife rehabilitators are currently exempt from this section’s permit requirements, and while many voluntarily obtain permits from the Department, they are not obligated to do so. 

 

Recently, the Department identified some circuses and a wildlife rehabilitator who intended to exhibit or use animals to entertain the public in settings that were not safe.  In one instance, circus animals had not been tested to rule out infection with a disease that could be transferred to humans. In other instances, circus animals were kept in enclosures that either did not adequately protect the public or were too small.  Although circuses are required to comply with the federal Animal Welfare Act, 7 U.S.C. 2131 et seq., administered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, this law only imposes limited animal care, animal health and public safety requirements.  In yet another instance, a wildlife rehabilitator proposed to  present adult performing bears on a theatre stage without barriers to protect the audience from the animals, and without adequate enclosures for the bears to stay in when they were not performing. The Department was able to use its general nuisance authority to address exhibitions and performances that do not adequately protect the public.

 

The Department believes circuses and wildlife rehabilitators should be required to have appropriate measures in place to adequately protect the public; and they should only be permitted to perform in the City if they comply with requirements that the City deems necessary to protect public health and safety.  Federal law does not preempt the local

regulation of circuses.[1] The Department therefore requests that the Board amend subdivision (a) of section 161.01 of

 

the Health Code to require that circuses

 

and wildlife rehabilitators in the City obtain permits from the Department in all cases when they intend to exhibit or use performing animals.

 

Amendments to Health Code §§161.01(b)(4)—Prohibited Animals

 

Health Code §161.01(b)(4) currently prohibits persons from harboring ferrets in New York City. Following the procedures described in Health Code §9.05, an individual petitioned the Board of Health to amend Article 161 to remove ferrets from the list of animals that cannot be kept in the City.  By letter dated May 16, 2014, the Commissioner, as the Board’s Chairperson, granted the petition and responded that the Board would consider an amendment to legalize ferrets no later than December 2014.  The proposed amendment would remove the prohibition on keeping domestic ferrets as pets, but would require certain safeguards. The proposed amendment requires that these pets:

  • Be immunized against rabies in accordance with Health Code §11.29;
  • Be sterilized to prevent their reproduction, and
  • Be restrained when outdoors.

The requirement to sterilize is being proposed to prevent an overpopulation of ferrets that could become a burden on the animal shelter system and as a part of responsible pet ownership. Additionally, sterilization may help reduce aggression and musky odor, and provide health benefits to the animal.  The Department is also proposing that this provision be effective September 1, 2015, roughly six months after the expected adoption of this provision, if the Board of Health adopts this proposal, to allow time for government and non-government agencies and property owners to develop and put into effect appropriate policies and guidance.

Amendment to Health Code §§161.21 and 11.29—Rabies Vaccinations

In 2010, Health Code §161.21 was amended to require that stables keep current rabies vaccination certificates for the horses they house. The Department is requesting that the Board further amend this section to require that horses’ owners, as well as the stables where they are kept, maintain proof that their horses are vaccinated.  

 

The Department also proposes that Health Code §11.29 be amended to:

1.     Add ferrets and horses to the list of animals that must be immunized against rabies and

2.      Change the terms “dogs” and “cats” in this section to “animals” to reflect that other animals would be specifically required to be currently vaccinated against rabies.

 

Amendment to Health Code §161.02—Definitions

 

The Department is proposing that the Board add a definition for “operating” or “in operation” to clarify that an animal business or facility regulated by the Health Code is required to comply with all of the provisions of the Health Code that apply to it regardless of whether the facility or business is open to the public.      

 

Amendments to §161.15—Cage or Box Dryers

 

This section currently requires boarding kennels to obtain proof from the owners of the dogs for which they care that the animals have been vaccinated against rabies and certain other diseases. The Department is proposing that the Board amend this section to clarify that this requirement is applicable to grooming parlors and training establishments.  In addition, these businesses would have to obtain proof from the owners of cats and ferrets that these types of animals have been vaccinated against rabies.

 

The Department is also proposing that the Board add a provision mirroring a State law requirement that prohibits grooming parlors and other facilities that handle small animals from drying an animal using the heating element contained in a cage or box dryer. These types of dryers have been associated with injuries and deaths of pets left unattended during drying. State Agriculture & Markets Law §353-e already prohibits their use in grooming facilities; this amendment would enable the Department to enforce this ban in the businesses it regulates.  

This section is being repealed.




[1] See, e.g., 7 U.S.C. 2145(b); Dehart v. Town of Austin, 39 F.3d 718, 722 (7th Cir. 1994) (“[T]he Animal Welfare Act expressly contemplates state and local regulation of animals.”)

 

 

Subject: 

Proposed resolution to amend Animals (Article 161) and Reportable Diseases and Conditions (Article 11) of the New York City Health Code

Location: 
New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Gotham Center
42-09 28th Street, Room 3-32
Queens, NY 11101-4132
Contact: 

Svetlana Burdeynik at (347) 396-6078 or resolutioncomments@health.nyc.gov

Download Copy of Proposed Rule (.pdf):