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Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

 

Statement of Basis and Purpose

During the 2014-15 and 2015-16 school years, the Department of Small Business Services (DSBS) administered a grant program to support the employment of experienced school bus workers who have been impacted by changes in the Department of Education’s (DOE) contracts for school bus transportation.  Pursuant to the authority vested in DSBS by New York City Charter § 1301, DSBS is proposing a rule that would continue the grant program for the 2016-17 school year.

Since 1979, following a school bus strike, DOE’s school bus contracts included employee protection provisions (EPPs) requiring school transportation contractors, among other things, to give priority in hiring to employees who became unemployed because of their employers’ loss of DOE bus contract work and to pay such employees the same wages and benefits they had received prior to becoming unemployed.

Following the 2011 decision by the New York State Court of Appeals in L&M Bus Corp., et al., v. the New York City Department of Education, et al. (L&M), DOE did not include EPPs or similar provisions in solicitations for its school bus contracts. After the issuance of the first such post-L&M solicitation, there was a school bus strike in January and February of 2013. 

DSBS’s grant program, created by Local Law 44 of 2014, was designed to encourage school bus contractors providing transportation services to DOE to maintain the wages and benefits of those employees who had prior experience in the industry.  The 2014-15 and 2015-16 grant programs successfully supported the employment of approximately 1200 school bus workers.  This proposed rule continues the school bus employee grant program for the 2016-17 school year.

Effective Date: 
Mon, 04/10/2017

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments

Agency:
Comment By: 
Tuesday, January 31, 2017
Proposed Rules Content: 

 Statement of Basis and Purpose

  During the 2014-15 and 2015-16 school years, the Department of Small Business Services (DSBS) administered a grant program to support the employment of experienced school bus workers who have been impacted by changes in the Department of Education’s (DOE) contracts for school bus transportation.  Pursuant to the authority vested in DSBS by New York City Charter § 1301, DSBS is proposing a rule that would continue the grant program for the 2016-17 school year.

  Since 1979, following a school bus strike, DOE’s school bus contracts included employee protection provisions (EPPs) requiring school transportation contractors, among other things, to give priority in hiring to employees who became unemployed because of their employers’ loss of DOE bus contract work and to pay such employees the same wages and benefits they had received prior to becoming unemployed.

  Following the 2011 decision by the New York State Court of Appeals in L&M Bus Corp., et al., v. the New York City Department of Education, et al. (L&M), DOE did not include EPPs or similar provisions in solicitations for its school bus contracts. After the issuance of the first such post-L&M solicitation, there was a school bus strike in January and February of 2013. 

            DSBS’s grant program, created by Local Law 44 of 2014, was designed to encourage school bus contractors providing transportation services to DOE to maintain the wages and benefits of those employees who had prior experience in the industry.  The 2014-15 and 2015-16 grant programs successfully supported the employment of approximately 1200 school bus workers.  This proposed rule continues the school bus employee grant program for the 2016-17 school year.

 

Subject: 

Extension of School Bus Drivers Grant Program

Location: 
110 William Street (7th Floor)
New York, NY 10038
Download Copy of Proposed Rule (.pdf): 

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

 

 

Statement of Basis and Purpose

 

The Department of Homeless Services (“DHS” or the “Department”) provides temporary emergency shelter to homeless New York City residents in accordance with State and local law, implementing regulations, and court orders, with the goal of moving shelter residents back into permanent housing in the community as soon as possible.

 

DHS proposes to amend Title 31 of the Rules of the City of New York by adding Chapter 3, which pertains to single adults who return to shelter in the adult services system after an extended absence. Currently, if a single adult shelter client returns to the system within 365 days, the client must return to his or her official shelter (i.e., the shelter where he or she had been previously assigned), where he or she will receive a bed. If a client returns more than 365 days later, the client is sent to a single adult intake center to reapply for shelter, at which point he or she undergoes a new resource assessment and is assigned to a new official shelter.

 

Through years of experience and practice, DHS has found that many single adult shelter clients exit the system and return after an extended absence (a period of at least thirty consecutive days), but within 365 days. Although it may be beneficial under certain circumstances for some of these clients to return directly to their official shelters, DHS seeks to provide other clients who return after an extended absence with a new resource assessment to identify alternative housing options they may have identified, utilized, or secured during their absence, and to connect them to resources or benefits that may alleviate their need for shelter and help them avoid re-entry into the system. Such alternative housing options can provide clients with long term housing stability, and assist in seeking benefits, employment, or other social services in the community. Importantly, even if no alternatives are immediately available, or if a client chooses not to utilize those alternatives at that time, the resource assessment will provide helpful information to the client and shelter staff at the client’s official shelter placement for on-going case management work.

 

Considering the value of this assessment, the proposed Chapter 3 provides for referral of a single adult shelter client returning to shelter after an extended absence to a diversion office (located at a DHS single adult intake center) to participate in a Single Adult Resource Assessment (“Assessment”) conducted by diversion staff. This Assessment will determine where a client resided during his or her extended absence from the adult services system, identify alternative housing options, and connect the client to resources or benefits to avoid re-entry into shelter. If none of these options are available or if the client does not wish to utilize any available options, the client will be referred back to his or her official shelter in the adult services system.

 

The Department notes that it does not believe that requiring a client returning after an extended absence to participate in a resource assessment must be promulgated as a rule pursuant to the City Administrative Procedure Act (“CAPA”), and believes that it may implement such a procedure outside of CAPA. However, in the exercise of caution and in light of the Court’s decision in Callahan v. Carey and Council of the City of New York v. Department of Homeless Services of the City of New York, 2012 N.Y. Misc. LEXIS 758 (Sup. Ct., N.Y. Co. 2012), the Department proposes to promulgate this procedure as a rule.

 

 

Effective Date: 
Sat, 09/07/2013