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Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Final Rule


The Fire Code regulates the manufacturing, storage, handling, use and transportation of hazardous materials in New York City, including fuel oil, a combustible liquid.

Section 3405-01 of the Fire Department’s rules (Title 3 of the Rules of the City of New York) allows mobile heating and power generating trailers to operate with a citywide permit, and sets forth permit, supervision, and design and installation requirements. The rule was originally developed in response to the use of these trailers to serve buildings whose heating or electrical systems were undergoing major repairs or replacement and were taken out of service.  The trailers are typically parked on the street and connected to building utilities by piping or electrical lines.

Effective Date: 
Wed, 03/15/2017

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments (View Public Comments Received:1)

Agency:
Comment By: 
Tuesday, January 3, 2017
Proposed Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Proposed Rule

 

The Fire Code regulates the manufacturing, storage, handling, use and transportation of hazardous materials in New York City, including fuel oil, a combustible liquid.

 

Currently, Section 3405-01 of the Fire Department’s rules (Title 3 of the Rules of the City of New York) allows mobile heating and power generating trailers to operate with a citywide permit, and sets forth permit, supervision, and design and installation requirements. The rule was originally developed in response to the use of these trailers to serve buildings whose heating or electrical systems were undergoing major repairs or replacement and were taken out of service.  The trailers are typically parked on the street and connected to building utilities by piping or electrical lines.

 

Permitting of Mobile Trailers for Outdoor Gatherings

 

When the current rule was promulgated, the Fire Department did not envision that these trailers would be used at public gatherings like street fairs and festivals near large numbers of people, cooking operations, and other activities where their presence may potentially pose a danger to others. In response to this unanticipated use of these trailers, the Fire Department is proposing to amend the rule to clarify when the citywide permit may be used and what it authorizes, and to specifically provide that a site-specific permit, different from the one used for building heating and electrical systems, is required for mobile heating and power generating trailers used at street fairs, bazaars, carnivals, concerts, festivals, and similar outdoor gatherings.

 

Additional Capacity Permitted

 

The Fire Department additionally proposes to amend the rule to increase from 550 gallons to 1200 gallons the fuel oil storage capacity permitted on mobile heating and power generating trailers.  Trailers with 1200-gallon tanks have become the industry standard; use of such trailers has been allowed by the Fire Department by modification (variance) without incident.  Although the rule would allow the on-site storage of a substantial additional amount of fuel, the risk of fire and fuel spills is greatest when the tanks are being filled.  During peak usage, when the equipment is in constant operation, a 550 gallon tank may need to be refueled daily.  The larger tank reduces the need for frequent fueling and therefore reduces the risk of fire or spills.  Accordingly, the Fire Department has concluded that 1200-gallon capacity trailers should be allowed, eliminating the need for special applications and additional fees to obtain permission to use larger tanks.

 

Elimination of Certificate of Fitness Requirement For Most Uses

 

The Fire Department further proposes to amend the rule to provide that mobile heating and power-generating trailers only need to be supervised when connected to a high-pressure boiler.  Personal supervision of most residential heating systems is no longer required by the New York City Department of Buildings (DOB) now that use of #6 fuel oil has been virtually eliminated for environmental reasons and replaced by fuels that do not require pre-heating.  Personal supervision by a DOB-licensed operating engineer continues to be required by DOB for high-pressure boilers.  Accordingly, under this proposal, the requirement of a certificate of fitness would be eliminated where no high-pressure boiler is involved.

 

Rule Clarifications

 

The proposed rule includes two clarifications.  First, the section would be amended to make clear that it applies only to mobile heating and power generating trailers with storage for more than 10 gallons of combustible liquid fuel on the trailer or in the equipment mounted thereon, which  require a permit as set forth in FC105.6 .

 

Second, the scope of the rule would be amended to clarify that a mobile trailer with heating and power generating equipment that stores 10 gallons or less of combustible liquid fuel (or no fuel) in or upon the trailer, but is fueled by an off-vehicle temporary tank, is subject to the permit requirement applicable to combustible liquid fuel storage in the tank (also set forth in FC105.6), rather than the permit requirement applicable to mobile trailers.

 

To summarize, the proposed rule:

 

1.    Clarifies the authorization granted to operate mobile trailers under a citywide permit and makes clear that use at a street fair requires a site-specific permit to address the fire safety concerns associated with operation at such an event;

 

2.    Allows larger (1200-gallon) tanks to be installed on such mobile trailers instead of the current 550 gallon tanks;

 

3.    Eliminates the supervision requirement except for use of such mobile trailers in connection with high-pressure boilers;

 

4.    Clarifies that the rule applies only to mobile heating and power generating trailers that require a permit – that is, trailers with storage for more than 10 gallons of combustible liquid fuel on the trailer or in the equipment mounted thereon; and

 

5.    Clarifies that a mobile trailer with heating and power generating equipment that stores 10 gallons or less of combustible liquid fuel (or no fuel) in or upon the trailer, but is fueled by an off-vehicle temporary tank, is subject to the permit requirement applicable to combustible liquid fuel storage in the tank, not the permit requirement applicable to mobile trailers.

 

Working with the City’s rulemaking agencies, the Law Department, and the Office of Management and Budget, the Office of Operations conducted a retrospective rules review of the City’s existing rules, identifying those rules that will be repealed or modified to reduce regulatory burdens, increase equity, support small businesses, and simplify and update content to help support public understanding and compliance. Portions of this proposed rule amendment were identified through this initiative.

 

Text that has been deleted is indicated by [brackets].  Text that has been added is underlined.

 

“Shall” and “must” denote mandatory requirements and may be used interchangeably in the rules of this department, unless otherwise specified or unless the context clearly indicates otherwise.

 

Guidance with respect to the interpretation of the Fire Code and Fire Department rules may be obtained using the Public Inquiry Form on the Fire Department’s website,http://www1.nyc.gov/site/fdny/about/resources/code-and-rules/nyc-fire-code.page.

 

Subject: 

Storage and Use of Fuel Oil on Mobile Trailers for Heating and Power Generation

Location: 
Fire Department Auditorium
9 MetroTech Center
Brooklyn, NY 11201
Contact: 

No contact

Download Copy of Proposed Rule (.pdf): 

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments

Agency:
Comment By: 
Thursday, October 30, 2014
Proposed Rules Content: 

The air cargo industry at John F. Kennedy International Airport (JFK) is an important source of jobs and economic activity in New York City. Air cargo employment at JFK depends on safe, convenient truck access to the airport.

 

    For safety reasons, existing New York City Department of Transportation (NYC DOT) regulations have prohibited trucks with trailers longer than 55 feet in total combined length from using portions of certain highways that provide access to JFK.  However, a 2008 engineering st study conducted by NYC DOT and the New York State Department of Transportation demonstrated that trucks with trailers up to 73 ½ feet in total combined length  − including trucks with 53-foot trailers, the standard tractor trailer combination used in the air cargo industry − c  can be operated safely between the George Washington Bridge and JFK using the route described in this proposed rule. Thus, the current regulations put JFK, and New York City as a whole, at a disadvantage when competing against other airports in the area for airport-based jo  jobs and economic activity, at a time when the New York City Economic Development Corporation and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey are planning to invest in modern, on-airport cargo facilities.

 

    The proposed rule will expand the transportation network upon which trucks with 53-foot trailers can operate in New York City.  It will:

 

  • Provide a clearly defined, safe route for drivers to haul 53-foot trailers from the George Washington Bridge to JFK Airport, exclusively using designated highways instead of local streets;
  • Support the growth of air cargo jobs at JFK; and
  • Continue to prohibit trucks with 53-foot trailers from being operated on any non-designated highway or street in New York City, such as destinations off the airport property in southern Queens.
Subject: 

DOT Amendment of Routes for Operation of Large Trailers

Location: 
1400 Williamsbridge Road 1st Floor Conference Room
Bronx, NY 10461
Contact: 

No contact