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Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

The DOT Commissioner is authorized by Section 2903(a) of the New York City Charter and Title 19 of the New York City Administrative Code to promulgate rules regarding parking and traffic operations in the City. The rule that DOT is adopting is contained within Chapter 4 of the Title 34 of the Rules of the City of New York relating to its Traffic Rules and Regulations.

The purpose of this new rule is to implement a carshare parking pilot program at designated on-street and off-street locations.

Carshare is a program involving vehicles that are owned or leased by organizations whose members rent these vehicles for short periods of time, and provides these members access to a car without the expense of car ownership. By designating parking locations specifically for carshare vehicles of these organizations, this new rule would expand access to carshare and provide an affordable mobility option to more New Yorkers.

Research in other cities shows that carshare programs reduce personal car ownership and vehicle miles travelled among carshare members. Fewer cars on the road and fewer vehicle miles travelled means less congestion, as well as lower carbon emissions and air pollution—key priorities of the City’s OneNYC Plan, which sets measurable goals for a strong, sustainable, resilient and equitable city. In accordance with Local Law No. 47, DOT will evaluate the impact of the pilot program on car ownership rates, mobility, and other relevant factors, including the potential of the pilot to reduce neighborhood parking demand.

The details describing the new rule reflect the following the program’s key components:
• requirement that carshare organizations apply for permits allowing the use of dedicated parking spaces, either on-street or in a municipal parking facility, within carshare parking zones
• requirement that carshare organizations pay a permit fee
• conditions of the carshare permit
• process by which a carshare permit is assigned
• data reporting requirements

In response to comments received by DOT, the following changes have been made to the proposed rule, which are reflected in the adopted rules:

• For clarification purposes, a definition of “equity parking space” has been added, and the definition of “hand control adapted carshare vehicle” has been modified.
• The use of the term “carshare” instead of “carsharing” has been adopted throughout the rule.
• The requirement of attaining an average of 27 miles per gallon (MPG) by all participating carshare vehicles has been removed.
• The conditions under which DOT can decline to issue a permit have been clarified.
• The conditions of a carshare permit have been streamlined, including removing the requirement that carshare organizations not move vehicles from garages or other spaces to the designated on street spaces.
• The paragraph relating to assignments for carshare parking spaces in municipal parking facilities has been re-organized.
• The “Round 3” of the assignment process for on-street carshare parking spaces has been revised.
• Maintenance area size has been reduced from 15 feet to 10 feet.
• The paragraph relating to the relocation of impermissibly parked vehicles has been simplified.

Effective Date: 
Wed, 10/11/2017

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments (View Public Comments Received:1)

Agency:
Comment By: 
Tuesday, August 1, 2017
Proposed Rules Content: 

The proposed rule amends the New York City Department of Transportation (“DOT”) Traffic Rules in relation to the implementation of a carshare parking pilot program. This notice was originally published in the City Record on June19, 2017 and has now been revised to clarify the requirements pertaining to permit fees being proposed in section 4-08(o)(6)(iii). There will be an application fee of $765 per carshare organization. For carshare parking spaces in municipal parking facilities, a carshare organization would be required to pay an additional quarterly or monthly permit fee charged by each municipal parking facility.

The purpose of these proposed rule amendments is to implement a carshare parking pilot program at designated on-street and off-street locations. Carsharing is a program involving vehicles that are owned or leased by organizations whose members rent these vehicles for short periods of time, and provides these members access to a car without the expense of car ownership. By designating parking locations specifically for carshare vehicles of these organizations, this new rule would expand access to carshare and provide an affordable mobility option to more New Yorkers.

Research in other cities shows that carshare programs reduce personal car ownership and vehicle miles travelled among carshare members. Fewer cars on the road and fewer vehicle miles travelled means less congestion, as well as lower carbon emissions and air pollution—key priorities of the City’s OneNYC Plan, which sets measurable goals for a strong, sustainable, resilient and equitable city. In accordance with Local Law No. 47, DOT will evaluate the impact of the pilot program on car ownership rates, mobility, and other relevant factors, including the potential of the pilot to reduce neighborhood parking demand.

Specifically, DOT proposes adding:
• requirement that carsharing organizations apply for permits allowing the use of dedicated parking spaces, either on-street or in a municipal parking facility, within carshare parking zones;
• requirement that carsharing organizations pay a permit fee
• conditions of the carshare permit
• process by which a carshare permit is assigned
• data reporting requirements

Subject: 

DOT amendment to Traffic Rules to implement a carshare parking pilot program

Location: 
DOT Bid Room
55 Water Street, Concourse Level Entrance is on the southeast corner of 55 Water St facing the NYC Vietnam Veterans Memorial Plaza
New York, NY 10041
Contact: 

Alex Keating
Director of Special Project
DOT Transportation Planning and Management
212-839-9685

Download Copy of Proposed Rule (.pdf): 

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

The Commissioner of the New York City Department of Transportation (DOT) is authorized to
promulgate rules regarding parking and traffic operations in the City by Section 2903(a) of the New
York City Charter. The rules that DOT is amending are contained within Chapter 4 of Title 34 of the
Rules of the City of New York, relating to the Traffic Rules and Regulations.

The purpose of these rule amendments is to update provisions that require modifications due to
changes in the law and to add provisions reflecting updated parking requirements.

The amendments to Chapter 4 of Title 34 are detailed more specifically below:

• Section 4-01(b) is amended to add the definition of “electronic communication device”, which
was originally located in Section 4-08(h)(11), and to add a new definition of “parking meter” and
“pedicab”. The definition for parking meter reflects the fact that the City no longer has single-
spaced meters, and therefore no longer needs to differentiate between single-spaced meters and
multi-spaced meters in the rules. The definition of “pedicab” mirrors the definition found in
section 19-171.2 of the New York City Administrative Code, as added by Local Law 31 of 2011.

• Section 4-08(a)(1) is amended to add a reference to pedicabs with respect to parking, standing
or stopping, mirroring section 19-171.2 of the Administrative Code.

• Section 4-08(a)(10) is deleted to remove obsolete language related to the use of notification
stickers on vehicles. Pursuant to section 19-163.2 of the Administrative Code, as added by Local
Law 20 of 2012, neither DOT nor the Department of Sanitation can affix notification stickers on any
motor vehicle solely in connection with the enforcement of alternate side parking rules.

• Section 4-08(a)(12) is deleted from the rules to reflect the fact that the in-vehicle-parking
system is no longer used within the City.

• Sections 4-08(h)(1), (2),(3), (4), and (5) are being replaced in their entirety with new
language to reflect updated parking requirements, such as the ability to pay for a parking session
via an authorized electronic communication device.

• Sections 4-08(h)(7), (10), (11) are deleted in their entirety to reflect the fact that single
spaced meters are no longer used in the City and that, pursuant to section 19-167.2 of the
Administrative Code, as added by Local Law 29 of 2012, parking meter receipts issued from one
parking meter zone may be used in in other parking meter zones of equal or lower rate structure
until the time
on such parking meter receipt has expired. The remaining paragraphs in the section are re- numbered
respectively.

• Sections 4-08(i)(3), 4-08(l)(3) and 4-08(l)(6) are amended to delete the term “muni-meter” and
replace it throughout the rules with the term “parking meter.”

• Section 4-08(p) is amended to reflect changes to the engine idling provisions pursuant to
section
24-163(f) of the Administrative Code, as added by Local Law 5 of 2009.

In response to comments received by the Department, the following changes were made to the proposed
rules, which are reflected in the adopted rules:

• Clarified section 4-08(h)(4) relating to the transfer of parking time by specifically noting
that this provision applies to payment via a receipt not an electronic communication device.
device.

Effective Date: 
Thu, 04/20/2017

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

Notice of Adoption of Traffic Rules related to pedestrian control signals. 

 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN PURSUANT TO THE AUTHORITY VESTED IN the Commissioner of Transportation by Sections 1043 and 2903 of the New York City Charter and in accordance with Section 19-195 of the Administrative Code of the City of New York and the requirements of Section 1043 of the New York City Charter, that the Department of Transportation hereby amends subdivision (b) of Section 4-01, subdivisions (a) and (c) of Section 4-03, and subdivision (a) of Section 4-04 of Chapter 4 (“Traffic Rules and Regulations”) of Title 34 of the Rules of the City of New York.

 

These rules were first published on November 29, 2016, and a public hearing was held on December 29, 2016. 

 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Adopted Rule

 

The Commissioner of the New York City Department of Transportation (DOT) is authorized to make rules regarding pedestrian traffic in the City pursuant to Section 2903(a) of the New York City Charter.  

 

Local Law 115 of 2016 amended the New York City Administrative Code by adding a new Section 19-195 regarding pedestrian control signals.  

 

Based on the provisions of Section 19-195, this rule:

 

·        

Adds a new definition for the term “pedestrian countdown display” to Section 4-01(b) of Title 34.

 

·        

Conforms the provisions in Sections 4-03(a)(2)(ii) and 4-03(c) of Title 34, regarding traffic and pedestrian control signals and pedestrian right of way, to the newly enacted Local Law 115 of 2016.

 

·        

Corrects an internal cross-reference within Section 4-04(a) of Title 34.

 

In 2014, Mayor de Blasio launched the Vision Zero action plan – an ambitious plan to reduce traffic fatalities in New York City. Vision Zero accepts no traffic fatality as inevitable. Vision Zero allows government agencies, industry groups, key transportation stakeholders and the public to understand traffic crashes as the result of a series of actions that can be changed or prevented through enforcement, education and design.  The Mayor has signed several local laws to implement Vision Zero.  Each law mandates specific requirements for one or more of the agencies involved in directly implementing Vision Zero.  This adopted rule supports the goals of Vision Zero.

 

New material is underlined.

[Deleted material is in brackets.]

 

“Shall” and “must” denote mandatory requirements and may be used interchangeably in the rules of this department, unless otherwise specified or unless the context clearly indicates otherwise.

 

Adopted Rules

 

§ 1.      Subdivision (b) of section 4-01 of title 34 of the rules of the city of New York is amended by adding a new definition of “pedestrian countdown display” in alphabetical order to read as follows:

 

Pedestrian countdown display.  A “pedestrian countdown display” shall mean any automated digital reading used in a crosswalk that displays, at the beginning of the flashing upraised hand signal, the number of seconds remaining until the termination of such signal. 

 

§ 2.      Subparagraph (ii) of paragraph (2) of subdivision (a) of section 4-03 of title 34 of the rules of the city of New York is amended to read as follows:

 

(ii) Pedestrians facing such signal are [thereby warned] advised that there [is] may be insufficient time to cross the roadway[, and shall not enter or cross the roadway].  Pedestrians already in the roadway [shall] must proceed to the nearest safety island or sidewalk in the direction of such signal.

 

§ 3.      Subdivision (c) of section 4-03 of title 34 of the rules of the city of New York is amended to read as follows:

 

(c) Pedestrian control signals. Whenever pedestrian control signals are in operation, [exhibiting the words "WALK" and "DON'T WALK" successively, the international green or red hand symbols, figures] showing symbols of a walking person, upraised hand, or upraised hand with a pedestrian countdown display, or any other internationally recognized representation concerning the movement of pedestrians, such signals shall indicate as follows:

(1) [WALK, green hand symbol or green] Steady walking [figure] person.  Pedestrians facing such signal may proceed across the roadway in the direction of [the] such signal [in any crosswalk. Vehicular], and other traffic [shall] must yield the right of way to such pedestrians.

(2) Flashing [DON'T WALK, red] upraised hand [symbol] or [red standing figure] flashing upraised hand with pedestrian countdown display.  Pedestrians facing such signal are [warned] advised that there [is] may be insufficient time to cross the roadway [and no pedestrian shall enter or cross the roadway].  Pedestrians already in the roadway [shall] must proceed to the nearest safety island or sidewalk in the direction of such signal.  [Vehicular] Other traffic [shall] must yield the right of way to [such] pedestrians proceeding across the roadway within the crosswalk towards such signal for as long as such signal remains flashing.

(3) Steady [DON'T WALK red] upraised hand [symbol or red standing figure.  Pedestrians facing such signal shall not enter or cross the roadway].  No pedestrians shall start to cross the roadway in the direction of such signal; provided, however that any pedestrians who have partially completed their crossing on a steady walking person signal or any flashing upraised hand signal must proceed to the nearest sidewalk or safety island in the direction of such signal while such steady upraised hand signal is showing.

 

§ 4.  Subdivision (a) of section 4-04 of title 34 of the rules of the city of New York is amended to read as follows:

 

 

(a) Pedestrians subject to traffic rules, except as otherwise provided herein. Pedestrians shall be subject to traffic control signals and pedestrian control signals as provided in §§4-03(a) and [4-03(b)] 4-03(c) of these rules and to the lawful orders and directions of any law enforcement officer, but at all other places pedestrians shall be accorded the privileges and shall be subject to the restrictions stated in this section.

Effective Date: 
Sun, 02/19/2017

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments

Agency:
Comment By: 
Tuesday, January 31, 2017
Proposed Rules Content: 

The proposed rule updates provisions that have become obsolete because of changes in the law and adds provisions reflecting updated parking requirements.

Keywords:
Subject: 

DOT Amendment to Traffic Rules

Location: 
DOT Bid Room
55 Water Street Concourse Level
New York, NY 10041
Contact: 

No contact

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments (View Public Comments Received:1)

Agency:
Comment By: 
Wednesday, December 10, 2014
Proposed Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Proposed Rule

 

On February 18, 2014, Mayor de Blasio launched the Vision Zero action plan – an ambitious plan to reduce traffic fatalities in New York City. Vision Zero accepts no traffic fatality as inevitable. Vision Zero allows government agencies, industry groups, key transportation stakeholders and the public to understand traffic crashes as the result of a series of actions that can be changed or prevented through enforcement, education and design.

 

The proposed rule would amend Section 4-06 of Title 34 of the Rules of the City of New York, which relates to speed limits.  The purpose of the proposed rule is to update the speed limit rule to correspond with an expected change to the citywide speed limit.  Intro. 466 of 2014, which is expected to be enacted in October, will amend Section 19-177 of the New York City Administrative Code to reduce the official citywide speed limit from the current thirty miles per hour to twenty-five miles per hour.  This local law change is pursuant to the authority provided by section 1642(a)(26) of the New York State Vehicle and Traffic Law, which was recently amended.  If enacted, Intro. 466 will take effect on November 7, 2014.  The Department of Transportation anticipates that this reduced speed limit will result in both fewer crashes involving pedestrians, and fewer fatalities and less severe injuries if crashes involving pedestrians do occur.   

 

These rule amendments are proposed pursuant to the authority of the Commissioner of the New York City Department of Transportation to make rules under sections 1043(a) and 2903(a) of the New York City Charter.

Subject: 

DOT Amendment of Traffic Rules Governing Speed LImit

Location: 
DOT
55 Water Street The entrance is located on the south side of the building facing the Vietnam Veterans Memorial
New York, NY 10041
Download Copy of Proposed Rule (.pdf): 

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

 

STATEMENT OF BASIS AND PURPOSE OF RULE

The Commissioner of the New York City Department of Transportation is authorized to promulgate rules regarding streets and highways in New York City pursuant to Section 2903 of the New York City Charter.

Although New York City has the highest bus ridership in the United States, it also has the  slowest bus speeds in the country. To improve bus speeds, the City has installed a series of restricted “bus lanes”, intended for the exclusive use of buses. As the bus lane network has grown, and new bus lane designs have been installed, the Department has found that existing bus lane rules do not provide sufficiently clear instructions as to what other vehicles can legally do within or approaching and exiting a bus lane. Additionally, the existing rule does not clearly prohibit non-motorized vehicles, including horse-drawn carriages, from using bus lanes.

By expanding and updating the bus lane rules, which establish the prohibitions associated with bus lanes, the rule will:

  • Improve bus speeds by helping keep bus lanes clear
  • Reduce confusion by other street users about what activities can legally take place in a bus lane
  • Clarify the rules regarding “offset” bus lanes, which allow parking or other curb access between the bus lane and the curbside.
  • Increase the Department rules’ specificity about where the bus lane may be legally used by non-bus vehicles to access right turns or gain curb access.

 

Effective Date: 
Mon, 12/02/2013

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

 

 

STATEMENT OF BASIS AND PURPOSE

 

Pursuant to §§ 1043 and 2903 (a) of the New York City Charter, the Commissioner of Transportation is authorized to promulgate rules regarding the conduct of vehicular and pedestrian traffic in the streets, squares, avenues, highways and parkways of the City as may be necessary.

 

Background

 

Based upon truck origin-destination data, recommendations from a truck study conducted in 2007 and truck route changes requested from the local industrial and trucking community, the Department of Transportation proposes to amend provisions of Title 34, Section 4-13 of the Rules of the City of New York in order to establish a more consistent designation of truck routes in the Borough of Brooklyn. Specifically, the proposed rule:

·       Changes the designation of: Gardner Avenue, Harrison Avenue, Johnson Avenue, Knickerbocker Avenue, Meadow Street, Morgan Avenue, Varick Avenue, and parts of Union Avenue and York Street to Local Truck Routes.

·       Dedesignates Lorimer Street, Wallabout Street and part of York Street as Local Truck Routes.

·       Clarifies the local truck route description for York Street, which states that the route runs along York Street from Navy to Cadman Plaza West. As York Street does not connect with Cadman Plaza West, this rule must be changed to state “Adams Street to Front Street”, as Front Street connects to Cadman Plaza.

 

 

Effective Date: 
Fri, 10/11/2013

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments

Agency:
Comment By: 
Wednesday, September 25, 2013
Proposed Rules Content: 

 

 

STATEMENT OF BASIS AND PURPOSE

 

 

The Commissioner of the New York City Department of Transportation is authorized to promulgate rules regarding streets and highways in New York City pursuant to Section 2903 of the New York City Charter.

 

Although New York City has the highest bus ridership in the United States, it also has the slowest bus speeds in the country. To improve bus speeds, the City has installed a series of restricted “bus lanes”, intended for the exclusive use of buses. As the bus lane network has grown, and new bus lane designs have been installed, the Department has found that existing bus lane rules do not provide sufficiently clear instructions as to what other vehicles can legally do within or approaching and exiting a bus lane. Additionally, the existing rule does not clearly prohibit non-motorized vehicles, including horse-drawn carriages, from using bus lanes.

 

By expanding and updating the bus lane rules, which establish the prohibitions associated with bus lanes, the proposed rule will:

• Improve bus speeds by helping keep bus lanes clear

• Reduce confusion by other street users about what activities can legally take place in a bus lane

• Clarify the rules regarding “offset” bus lanes, which allow parking or other curb access between the bus lane and the curbside.

• Increase the Department rules’ specificity about where the bus lane may be legally used by non-bus vehicles to access right turns or gain curb access.

 

 

Subject: 

Opportunity to comment on Department of Transportation’s proposed amendment to the rules relating to bus lanes.

Location: 
New York City Department of Transportation
55 Water Street, 8th Floor, Room 809B
New York, NY 10041
Contact: 

Eric Beaton
Director, Transit Development
New York City Department of Transportation
55 Water Street
New York, New York 10041
ebeaton@dot.nyc.gov

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments

Agency:
Comment By: 
Friday, September 7, 2012
Proposed Rules Content: 

 

 

STATEMENT OF BASIS AND PURPOSE

 

The Commissioner of the New York City Department of Transportation (DOT) is authorized to promulgate rules regarding highway operations in the City pursuant to Section 2903(b) of the New York City Charter.

 

The purpose of the proposed rule is to provide pedestrian and cyclist safety around large construction projects.

The proposed rule will achieve this goal by:

·         giving the Department of Transportation Commissioner discretion to require the use of pedestrian traffic managers at selected construction sites.

·         providing experience and certification criteria for pedestrian traffic managers.

 

Background

DOT permittees already provide staff to control vehicular traffic around large construction projects. However, with the increase in bicycle ridership and pedestrian volume throughout the city, it is important that permittees also place trained pedestrian traffic managers, who will focus on bicycle and pedestrian safety, in and around major construction projects. Permittees have recently deployed pedestrian traffic managers successfully at large construction sites, such as the World Trade Center site and the reconstruction of Peck Slip in Lower Manhattan.

 

 

Subject: 

Opportunity to comment on proposed amendment by the Department of Transportation of rules relating to pedestrian traffic managers.

Location: 
DOT
55 Water Street BID Room, Room A
New York, NY 10041
Contact: 

Joshua Benson
Director of Bicycle and Pedestrian Programs
55 Water Street, 6th Floor
New York, NY 10041
212-839-7193