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Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments (View Public Comments Received:1)

Agency:
Comment By: 
Tuesday, October 16, 2018
Proposed Rules Content: 

Proposed amendments to Chapters 2, 3, 5, 7 and 11 of title 63 of the Rules of the City of New York, consisting of amendments, consolidation and reorganization of existing rules, and new rules, including in Chapter 2, amendments to sections 2-11 through 2-35; new rules concerning barrier-free access, sidewalks and excavation; in Chapter 3, repeal of the chapter and its reorganization, as amended, into Chapter 2; in Chapter 5, amendments to sections 5-01 through 5-03 and new section 5-04; in Chapter 7, amendments to sections 7-01 through 7-06; and in Chapter 11, amendments to sections 11-01 through 11-06.

Subject: 

.Proposed amendments to Chapters 2, 3, 5, 7 and 11 of title 63 of the Rules of the City of New York, consisting of amendments, consolidation and reorganization of existing rules, and new rules, including in Chapter 2, amendments to sections 2-11 through 2-35; new rules concerning barrier-free access, sidewalks and excavation; in Chapter 3, repeal of the chapter and its reorganization, as amended, into Chapter 2. This is a revised version of amendments originally published in January 2018.

Location: 
Landmarks Preservation Commission Offices
Municipal Building 1 Centre Street, 9th Floor North
New York, NY 10007
Contact: 

Mark Silberman, 212.669.7919

Download Copy of Proposed Rule (.pdf): 

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments (View Public Comments Received:9)

Agency:
Comment By: 
Tuesday, May 8, 2018
Proposed Rules Content: 

Proposed amendments to Chapters 2, 3, 5, 7 and 11 of title 63 of the Rules of the City of New York, consisting of amendments, consolidation and reorganization of existing rules, and new rules, including in Chapter 2, amendments to sections 2-11 through 2-35; new rules concerning barrier-free access, sidewalks and excavation; in Chapter 3, repeal of the chapter and its reorganization, as amended, into Chapter 2; in Chapter 5, amendments to sections 5-01 through 5-03 and new section 5-04; in Chapter 7, amendments to sections 7-01 through 7-06; and in Chapter 11, amendments to sections 11-01 through 11-06.

Subject: 

Proposed amendments to the Landmarks Preservation Commission's rules in Chapters 2, 3, 5, 7 and 11 of title 63 of the Rules of the City of New York, consisting of amendments, consolidation and reorganization of existing rules, and new rules.

Location: 
Landmarks Preservation Commission Hearing Room
Municipal Building 1 Centre Street, 9th Floor North
New York, NY 10007
Contact: 

Amber Nowak, 212-669-7817

Download Copy of Proposed Rule (.pdf): 

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 


Statement of Basis and Purpose of Rule

The City Council enacted Local Law 153 of 2013 to establish opportunities to cure first-time violations of specified laws and rules set forth in the City’s Administrative Code and the Rules of the City of New York rather than to impose fines for violations of those laws and rules. Section 16 of Local Law 153 requires the Department of Consumer Affairs (the Department) to promulgate rules establishing opportunities to cure the first violation of twenty-four described signage requirements set forth in Title 6 of the City’s Rules.  The rule establishes opportunities to cure first-time violations of the specified mandates described in section 16.   

The rule amends 6 RCNY § 6-31, entitled “Pre-Hearing Disposition of Violations,” by adding a new subsection “d.”  New subsection “d,” entitled “Opportunities to Cure,” implements the mandate of section 16 of Local Law 153.  It creates the opportunity for a business that receives, for the first-time, a violation of one of twenty-four specified “signage mandates” to avoid a civil penalty by providing satisfactory proof that the violation has been cured. 

A first-time violator seeking to avoid the civil penalty must submit proof that he or she cured the violation within thirty days of receiving a notice of violation and before the commencement of the adjudication of the violation.  The rule requires the business to submit a self-certification on a form approved by the Department stating the manner of the cure and the date on which it occurred.  The Department may seek additional information reasonably necessary to prove that the violation was cured within thirty days.  A submission of proof of a cure by a business will constitute its admission of liability for all purposes. 

Under the rule, a business may submit proof of the cure in person, by mail or electronically.  The Department will offer the opportunity to cure as part of every offer of settlement made by the Department to a person who has received, for the first time, a notice of violation of a specified signage mandate.

The rule requires the Department to notify a business when the proof of cure it has submitted is not satisfactory.  A business may seek review by the Department’s administrative tribunal of a determination that the proof is not satisfactory within fifteen days of receiving written notice that the proof is not satisfactory. 

Paragraph 6 of new subsection “d” sets forth the specific signage mandates in Title 6 of the Rules of the City of New York for which opportunities to cure first time violations will be available.  They are as follows:  

  • 6 RCNY § 1-03(a), requiring the posting of a sign stating that individuals may complain to the Department about a licensed business;
  • 6 RCNY § 1-03(b), requiring sidewalk cafes to post a sign stating the maximum number of tables and chairs licensed for such sidewalk café;
  • 6 RCNY § 2-24, requiring amusement arcades and gaming cafes to post a sign describing age restrictions during certain hours of operation;
  • 6 RCNY § 2-57(f), prohibiting sidewalk cafes from posting signage or advertising except for a  sign affixed to the valance of an awning with the name of the establishment in lettering not exceeding eight (8) inches in height on a twelve (12) inch valance in a single horizontal line;
  • 6 RCNY § 2-131(s)(4), requiring laundries to distinguish in their advertising between services offered at different prices;
  • 6 RCNY § 2-131(u), requiring an automatic or coin-operated laundry to post a sign on non-functioning machines;
  • 6 RCNY § 2-131(v)(1), requiring a laundry to post a notice that complaints and claims for refunds may be made to a certain person or person;
  • 6 RCNY § 2-131(v)(5), requiring that the information in the sign required by 6 RCNY § 131(v) be in both English and Spanish;
  • 6 RCNY § 2-161(g)(1), requiring that parking lots and garages have separate entrances and exits, with the main entrance clearly designated with illuminated signs marked “entrance” and “exit”;
  • 6 RCNY § 2-161(g)(2)(v), requiring that parking lot and garage auxiliary signs contain equally sized letters and numbers;
  • 6 RCNY § 2-161(g)(2)(vi), requiring that parking lots and garages post a sign stating:
    • (a) the business hours;
    • (b) the licensed capacity;
    • (c) the minimum number of bicycle parking spaces;
  • 6 RCNY § 2-161(g)(3)(i), requiring that the parking garage and lot sign required by 6 RCNY § 2-161(g)(2) is illuminated, clearly visible and readable;
  • 6 RCNY § 2-161(h)(1), requiring the posting of a sign that the garage is at full capacity for car parking;
  • 6 RCNY § 2-161(h)(2), requiring the posting of a sign that the garage is at full capacity for bicycle parking;
  • 6 RCNY § 2-161(u), requiring that parking lots and garages with waivers under section 20-327.1 of subchapter 17 of Chapter 2 of Title 20 of the Administrative Code of the City of New York post a sign that bicycle parking is not required by law;
  • 6 RCNY § 2-211(h), requiring a sightseeing bus post a sign on the windshield and near the entrance door of such bus that designates the departure time and destination of such bus;
  • 6 RCNY § 2-253(a)(3) and (4), requiring that electronic or home appliance service dealers post a notice in the department or area where electronic and home appliances are accepted for repair stating that customers are entitled to written estimates for repairs and other customer rights, and that the regulations of the Department relating to television, radio and audio servicing are available for review from the service dealer upon request;
  • 6 RCNY § 2-275(c), requiring dealers of products for the disabled to post a sign summarizing provisions of the New York City Products for the Disabled Law;
  • 6 RCNY § 3-12, requiring labeling declarations required by subchapter A of Chapter 3 of Title 6 of the Rules of the City of New York to be written in the English language;
  • 6 RCNY § 3-24(f)(2), requiring stores with weighing and measuring devices for customer use to post a sign informing customer that they may reweigh products using such weighing or measuring device or devices;
  • 6 RCNY § 5-24, requiring that a business that accepts credit cards post a list of limitations that such business puts on credit card usage at or near the entrance of the business and in all advertising indicating that credit cards are accepted;
  • 6 RCNY § 5-37, requiring the posting of refund policies;
  • 6 RCNY § 5-40(e), prohibiting a sign stating that a business is not liable for its negligence if such a statement is invalid under law;
  • 6 RCNY § 5-46(d), requiring a motor vehicle rental business to post a sign not less than twelve (12) inches by eighteen (18) inches in dimension with lettering not less than one (1) inch high providing information about how to complain to the Department and setting forth consumers’ rights under the Consumer Protection Law;;
  • 6 RCNY § 5-66(c), requiring that tax preparers post a sign:
    • (a) stating his or her name, address, telephone number and qualifications;
    • (b) stating that the preparer and taxpayer must sign every tax return;
    • (c) stating how his or her fees are calculated;
    • (d) stating that he or she or his or her agency will not represent the taxpayer in an audit, if true; and
    • (e) stating that he or she is not licensed by the state board of public accounting or the New York state bar, or both, if true; and
  • 6 RCNY § 5-195, requiring signage at businesses that sell beverages for off-premises consumption in beverage containers that are covered by title ten of article twenty-seven of the Environmental Conservation Law of the State of New York to be placed with a certain distance of cash registers or to be visible to consumers from any specific vantage point.

The Department of Consumer Affairs’s authority for these rules is found in section 2203 of the New York City Charter and sections 20-104(b) of the New York City Administrative Code.

Effective Date: 
Fri, 07/11/2014

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments

Agency:
Comment By: 
Friday, April 25, 2014
Proposed Rules Content: 

 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Proposed Rule

The City Council enacted Local Law 153 of 2013 to establish opportunities to cure first-time violations of specified laws and rules set forth in the City’s Administrative Code and the Rules of the City of New York rather than to impose fines for violations of those laws and rules. Section 16 of Local Law 153 requires the Department of Consumer Affairs (the Department) to promulgate rules establishing opportunities to cure the first violation of twenty-four described signage requirements set forth in Title 6 of the City’s Rules.  The proposed rule establishes opportunities to cure first-time violations of the specified mandates described in section 16.   

The proposed rule amends 6 RCNY § 6-31, entitled “Pre-Hearing Disposition of Violations,” by adding a new subsection “d.”  New subsection “d,” entitled “Opportunities to Cure,” implements the mandate of section 16 of Local Law 153.  It creates the opportunity for a business that receives, for the first-time, a violation of one of twenty-four specified “signage mandates” to avoid a civil penalty by providing satisfactory proof that the violation has been cured. 

A first-time violator seeking to avoid the civil penalty must submit proof that he or she cured the violation within thirty days of receiving a notice of violation and before the commencement of the adjudication of the violation.  The rule requires the business to submit a self-certification on a form approved by the Department stating the manner of the cure and the date on which it occurred.  The Department may seek additional information reasonably necessary to prove that the violation was cured within thirty days.  A submission of proof of a cure by a business will constitute its admission of liability for all purposes. 

Under the proposed rule, a business may submit proof of the cure in person, by mail or electronically.  The Department will offer the opportunity to cure as part of every offer of settlement made by the Department to a person who has received, for the first time, a notice of violation of a specified signage mandate.

The proposed rule requires the Department to notify a business when the proof of cure it has submitted is not satisfactory.  A business may seek review by the Department’s administrative tribunal of a determination that the proof is not satisfactory within fifteen days of receiving written notice that the proof is not satisfactory. 

Paragraph 6 of new subsection “d” sets forth the specific signage mandates in Title 6 of the Rules of the City of New York for which opportunities to cure first time violations will be available.  They are as follows:

  • 6 RCNY § 1-03(a), requiring the posting of a sign stating that individuals may complain to the Department about a licensed business;
  • 6 RCNY § 1-03(b), requiring sidewalk cafes to post a sign stating the maximum number of tables and chairs licensed for such sidewalk café;
  • 6 RCNY § 2-24, requiring amusement arcades and gaming cafes to post a sign describing age restrictions during certain hours of operation;
  • 6 RCNY § 2-57(f), prohibiting sidewalk cafes from posting signage or advertising except for a  sign affixed to the valance of an awning with the name of the establishment in lettering not exceeding eight (8) inches in height on a twelve (12) inch valance in a single horizontal line;
  • 6 RCNY § 2-131(s)(4), requiring laundries to distinguish in their advertising between services offered at different prices;
  • 6 RCNY § 2-131(u), requiring an automatic or coin-operated laundry to post a sign on non-functioning machines;
  • 6 RCNY § 2-131(v)(1), requiring a laundry to post a notice that complaints and claims for refunds may be made to a certain person or person;
  • 6 RCNY § 2-131(v)(5), requiring that the information in the sign required by 6 RCNY § 131(v) be in both English and Spanish;
  • 6 RCNY § 2-161(g)(1), requiring that parking lots and garages have separate entrances and exits, with the main entrance clearly designated with illuminated signs marked “entrance” and “exit”;
  • 6 RCNY § 2-161(g)(2)(v), requiring that parking lot and garage auxiliary signs contain equally sized letters and numbers;
  • 6 RCNY § 2-161(g)(2)(vi), requiring that parking lots and garages post a sign stating:

(a) the business hours;
(b) the licensed capacity;
(c) the minimum number of bicycle parking spaces;

  • 6 RCNY § 2-161(g)(3)(i), requiring that the parking garage and lot sign required by 6 RCNY § 2-161(g)(2) is illuminated, clearly visible and readable;
  • 6 RCNY § 2-161(h)(1), requiring the posting of a sign that the garage is at full capacity for car parking;
  • 6 RCNY § 2-161(h)(2), requiring the posting of a sign that the garage is at full capacity for bicycle parking;
  • 6 RCNY § 2-161(u), requiring that parking lots and garages with waivers under section 20-327.1 of subchapter 17 of Chapter 2 of Title 20 of the Administrative Code of the City of New York post a sign that bicycle parking is not required by law;
  • 6 RCNY § 2-211(h), requiring a sightseeing bus post a sign on the windshield and near the entrance door of such bus that designates the departure time and destination of such bus;
  • 6 RCNY § 2-253(a)(3) and (4), requiring that electronic or home appliance service dealers post a notice in the department or area where electronic and home appliances are accepted for repair stating that customers are entitled to written estimates for repairs and other customer rights, and that the regulations of the Department relating to television, radio and audio servicing are available for review from the service dealer upon request;
  • 6 RCNY § 2-275(c), requiring dealers of products for the disabled to post a sign summarizing provisions of the New York City Products for the Disabled Law;
  • 6 RCNY § 3-12, requiring labeling declarations required by subchapter A of Chapter 3 of Title 6 of the Rules of the City of New York to be written in the English language;
  • 6 RCNY § 3-24(f)(2), requiring stores with weighing and measuring devices for customer use to post a sign informing customer that they may reweigh products using such weighing or measuring device or devices;
  • 6 RCNY § 5-24, requiring that a business that accepts credit cards post a list of limitations that such business puts on credit card usage at or near the entrance of the business and in all advertising indicating that credit cards are accepted;
  • 6 RCNY § 5-37, requiring the posting of refund policies;
  • 6 RCNY § 5-40(e), prohibiting a sign stating that a business is not liable for its negligence if such a statement is invalid under law;
  • 6 RCNY § 5-46(d), requiring a motor vehicle rental business to post a sign not less than twelve (12) inches by eighteen (18) inches in dimension with lettering not less than one (1) inch high providing information about how to complain to the Department and setting forth consumers’ rights under the Consumer Protection Law;
  • 6 RCNY § 5-66(c), requiring that tax preparers post a sign:

(a) stating his or her name, address, telephone number and qualifications;
(b) stating that the preparer and taxpayer must sign every tax return;
(c) stating how his or her fees are calculated;
(d) stating that he or she or his or her agency will not represent the taxpayer in an audit, if true; and
(e) stating that he or she is not licensed by the state board of public accounting or the New York state bar, or both, if true; and

  • 6 RCNY § 5-195, requiring signage at businesses that sell beverages for off-premises consumption in beverage containers that are covered by title ten of article twenty-seven of the Environmental Conservation Law of the State of New York to be placed with a certain distance of cash registers or to be visible to consumers from any specific vantage point.

The Department of Consumer Affairs’ authority for these rules is found in section 2203 of the New York City Charter and sections 20-104(b) of the New York City Administrative Code.

 

Subject: 

Cure period for signage violations

Location: 
Department of Consumer Affairs Hearing Room
66 John St 11th Floor
New York, NY 10038
Contact: 

N/A

Download Copy of Proposed Rule (.pdf): 

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

Effective July 1, 2013, a construction or demolition project requiring a New York City Department of Buildings permit and whose site is enclosed with a fence or contains a sidewalk shed must comply with the signage requirements of Local Law 47 for the year 2013. The purpose of this rule is to clarify existing New York City Department of Transportation (DOT) signage requirements for its permittees so that these requirements do not conflict with the new local law. The rule will achieve this goal by: • Distinguishing between two different signs currently required by DOT: (1) signage along a series of excavations or street openings, and (2) signage for any project with a projected completion time of three months or more; and • Listing the various content requirements for each type of required sign.

Effective Date: 
Wed, 04/16/2014

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments

Agency:
Comment By: 
Wednesday, February 19, 2014
Proposed Rules Content: 

 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Proposed Rule

Effective July 1, 2013, a construction or demolition project requiring a New York City Department of Buildings permit and whose site is enclosed with a fence or contains a sidewalk shed must comply with the signage requirements of Local Law 47 for the year 2013.

The purpose of this proposed rule is to clarify existing New York City Department of Transportation (DOT) signage requirements for its permittees so that these requirements do not conflict with the new local law. The proposed rule will achieve this goal by:

·        Distinguishing between two different signs currently required by DOT: (1) signage along a series of excavations or street openings, and (2) signage for any project with a projected completion time of three months or more; and

·        Listing the various content requirements for each type of required sign.

DOT’s authority for these rules is found in sections 2903(b)(1) and (5)of the New York City Charter.

 

Subject: 

DOT rule proposing to clarify signage requirments for DOT permittees

Location: 
BID Room A
55 Water Street, Ground Floor Entrance is located on the south side of the building facing the Vietnam Veterans Memorial
New York, NY 10041
Contact: 

Joseph P. Noto

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

 

 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Rule

 

The City Council enacted Local Law 9 of 2013 amending section 20-672 of the Administrative Code of the City of New York to require that all gas stations post road signs displaying the total selling price of gasoline or diesel motor fuel. The law also requires that, where the total selling price for purchases made with cash is less than for purchases made with another form of payment, such as debit or credit card, the road signs disclose the total selling price for cash, debit card and credit purchases. The rule amends 6 RCNY 4-63(b) to implement the requirements of Local Law 9.

 

The rule amends 6 RCNY 4-63(b)(1) to require gas stations to post a road sign not less than 60 inches wide and 36 inches high advertising the price of the petroleum products for sale. The current rule does not require such a sign, but only sets forth the required content of a sign if the gas station chooses to advertise the petroleum product for sale.

 

The rule adds a new subparagraph (iv) to 6 RCNY 4-63(b)(2) to require that, when the price of the petroleum product is less for a cash purchase than other forms of purchase, the mandated road sign and all other curb signs advertising the sale of gasoline and diesel motor fuel must display the total selling price per gallon with cash, debit card, credit card or other form of payment for each grade of the petroleum product offered for sale.

 

The rule amends subparagraph (ii) of section 4-63(b)(5) to require that the minimum type size used on the mandated road sign is at least 430 points to ensure that the price and other information can be read by motorists.

 

 

Effective Date: 
Tue, 11/12/2013

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments

Agency:
Comment By: 
Monday, September 16, 2013
Proposed Rules Content: 

 

 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Proposed Rule

 

 

The City Council enacted Local Law 9 of 2013 amending section 20-672 of the Administrative Code of the City of New York to require that all gas stations post road signs displaying the total selling price of gasoline or diesel motor fuel. The law also requires that, where the total selling price for purchases made with cash is less than for purchases made with another form of payment, such as debit or credit card, the road signs disclose the total selling price for cash, debit card and credit purchases. The proposed rule amends 6 RCNY 4-63(b) to implement the requirements of Local Law 9.

 

 

The proposed rule amends 6 RCNY 4-63(b)(1) to require gas stations to post a road sign not less than 60 inches wide and 36 inches high advertising the price of the petroleum products for sale. The current rule does not require such a sign, but only sets forth the required content of a sign if the gas station chooses to advertise the petroleum product for sale.

 

 

The proposed rule adds a new subparagraph (iv) to 6 RCNY 4-63(b)(2) to require that, when the price of the petroleum product is less for a cash purchase than other forms of purchase, the mandated road sign and all other curb signs advertising the sale of gasoline and diesel motor fuel must display the total selling price per gallon with cash, debit card, credit card or other form of payment for each grade of the petroleum product offered for sale.

 

 

The proposed rule amends subparagraph (ii) of section 4-63(b)(5) to require that the minimum type size used on the mandated road sign is at least 430 points to ensure that the price and other information can be read by motorists.

 

 

The proposed rule was not included in the Department of Consumer Affairs regulatory agenda because the rule was not anticipated at the time the regulatory agenda was created.

 

 

 

 

Download Copy of Proposed Rule (.pdf): 

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments

Agency:
Comment By: 
Friday, August 9, 2013
Proposed Rules Content: 

 

 

STATEMENT OF BASIS AND PURPOSE

 

Intentional hyperventilation and competitive, repetitive or prolonged underwater swimming or breath-holding can be dangerous. During these activities the levels of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the body can drop, delaying the breathing reflex. Coupled with the lack of oxygen to the brain, a swimmer can lose consciousness and drown.

 

The Department has identified four drowning incidents in New York City and 12 other incidents in New York State between 1988 and 2011 that were confirmed or suspected to have been caused by a loss of consciousness underwater due to lack of oxygen caused by intentional hyperventilation or by competitive, repetitive or prolonged underwater swimming or breath-holding. Four of the sixteen swimmers involved died in incidents associated with intentional hyperventilation. Yet, many swimmers are unaware of the risks associated with these activities.

 

The Department has also studied relevant policies, practices and guidance of multiple jurisdictions and organizations with respect to these specific swimming behaviors. Several jurisdictions require pool operators to post signs regarding the risks associated with prolonged breath-holding activities and extended underwater swimming. These signage requirements can be found in the rules of local governmental jurisdictions that regulate pool facilities and in the policies of large governmental entities and non-governmental organizations that own and operate pool facilities. Additionally, governmental agencies and safety awareness organizations have developed guidance and educational material that promotes swimming behavior rules and/or signage requirements to reduce the risks of the above activities.

 

Article 165 of the Health Code addresses bathing establishments, including swimming pools. The Department is proposing that this article be amended to require that the operators of bathing establishments discourage intentional hyperventilation and competitive, repetitive or prolonged underwater swimming or breath-holding, but if allowed, only under supervision in accordance with the pool’s approved pool safety plan. The amendments would also require all pool operators to post signage advising swimmers that these activities are dangerous.

 

The Department also proposes to require pool operators to update their safety plan when there are programing or operational changes at the facility and/or as directed by the Department.

 

 

PROPOSED CHANGES TO THE HEALTH CODE

 

The following changes to Article 165 are proposed:

 

       §165.19 - Pool Safety Plan – The proposed amendments would require a pool’s safety plan to be updated when there are changes to operations or conditions and/or as directed by the Department.

 

       §165.21 (l) - Facility Operating Policy – The proposed amendments would add a provision stating that intentional hyperventilation and competitive, repetitive or prolonged underwater swimming or breath-holding be discouraged, and permitted only when supervised in accordance with a pool safety plan approved pursuant to §165.19.

 

       §165.41(u)(2)(k) - Safety and Warning Signs – The proposed amendments would add a requirement to include a sign warning that intentional hyperventilation and competitive, repetitive or prolonged underwater swimming or breath-holding are dangerous and can be deadly. This rule will take effect 90 days after adoption by the Board of Health.

 

 

Subject: 

Opportunity to comment on the proposed amendment of Article 165 of the New York City Health Code, related to swimming pools.

Location: 
New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene
42-09 28th Street 14th Floor, Room 14-44
Queens, NY 11101
Contact: 

Rena Bryant
New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene Board of Health
Secretary to the Board of Health
42-09 28th Street, CN31
Queens, NY 11101
(347) 396-6071

Download Copy of Proposed Rule (.pdf): 

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments

Agency:
Comment By: 
Tuesday, June 28, 2011
Proposed Rules Content: 



 Click here (.pdf) for the complete text of the proposed rule.