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Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments

Agency:
Comment By: 
Tuesday, November 21, 2017
Proposed Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Proposed Rule

 

The Office of Citywide Events Coordination and Management (OCECM), Street Activity Permit Office (SAPO) administers New York City’s permit system for street activities, block parties and fairs.

 

Each year SAPO issues permits to over 200 street fairs and over 5,000 other events, most of which  include the use of multiple blocks over several days, the erection of structures, the vending of food, apparel and other goods and the use of amplified sound and the performance of music.  Events like these require additional police officers which increases overtime costs to the City.  These events also divert police officers from core crime fighting, public safety and counter terrorism duties.

 

To more effectively deploy police resources and control overtime costs, the New York City Police Department has requested that SAPO exercise its discretion temporarily to deny permits for additional events scheduled for calendar year 2018.  The proposed rules will authorize SAPO to deny permits to these events only if the event was not held in the calendar year 2017. Events that received permits in calendar year 2017 will be eligible to receive permits again in calendar year 2018.

 

SAPO authority for these rules is found in section 1043 of the New York City Charter and Executive Order No. 105 of 2007.

 

New material is underlined.

 

[Deleted material is in brackets.]

Subject: 

Street Activities Permit Office - Proposed Street Fair Moratorium Rule

Location: 
Auditorium
125 Worth Street, 2nd floor
New York, NY 10007
Contact: 

Dawn Tolson; (212) 788-1440

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Rule

The Office of Citywide Events Coordination and Management (OCECM), Street Activity Permit Office (SAPO) administers New York City’s permit system for street activities, block parties and fairs.

Each year SAPO issues permits to over 200 street fairs and over 5,000 other events, most of which  include the use of multiple blocks over several days, the erection of structures, the vending of food, apparel and other goods and the use of amplified sound and the performance of music.  Events like these require additional police officers which increases overtime costs to the City.  These events also divert police officers from core crime fighting, public safety and counter terrorism duties.

To more effectively deploy police resources and control overtime costs, the New York City Police Department has requested that SAPO exercise its discretion temporarily to deny permits for additional events scheduled for calendar year 2017.  The proposed rules will authorize SAPO to deny permits to these events only if the event was not held in the calendar year 2016. Events that received permits in calendar year 2016 will be eligible to receive permits again in calendar year 2017.

SAPO authority for these rules is found in section 1043 of the New York City Charter and Executive Order No. 105 of 2007.

Effective Date: 
Fri, 12/30/2016

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments (View Public Comments Received:4)

Agency:
Comment By: 
Friday, December 2, 2016
Proposed Rules Content: 

                                    Statement of Basis and Purpose of Proposed Rule

The Office of Citywide Events Coordination and Management (OCECM), Street Activity Permit Office (SAPO) administers New York City’s permit system for street activities, block parties and fairs.

Each year SAPO issues permits to over 200 street fairs and over 5,000 other events, most of which include the use of multiple blocks over several days, the erection of structures, the vending of food, apparel and other goods and the use of amplified sound and the performance of music. Events like these require additional police officers which increases overtime costs to the City. These events also divert police officers from core crime fighting, public safety and counter terrorism duties.

To more effectively deploy police resources and control overtime costs, the New York City Police Department has requested that SAPO exercise its discretion temporarily to deny permits for additional events scheduled for calendar year 2017. The proposed rules will authorize SAPO to deny permits to these events only if the event was not held in the calendar year 2016. Events that received permits in calendar year 2016 will be eligible to receive permits again in calendar year 2017.

SAPO authority for these rules is found in section 1043 of the New York City Charter and Executive Order No. 105 of 2007.

Subject: 

Street Fair Moratorium

Location: 
Spector Hall
22 Reade Street
New York, NY 10007
Download Copy of Proposed Rule (.pdf): 

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments (View Public Comments Received:45)

Agency:
Comment By: 
Monday, October 24, 2016
Proposed Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Proposed Rule

 The Mayor’s Office of Citywide Events Coordination and Management (OCECM), which oversees the Street Activity Permit Office (SAPO), has been designated by the Mayor under Executive Order Nos. 100 and 105 of 2007 to administer the rules governing the issuance of permits on city streets.

Each year since 2004 the New York City Police Department (NYPD) has asked SAPO to exercise its discretion to temporarily deny permits for additional multi-day and single-day multi-block street fairs because these place an excessive burden on police resources and divert uniformed personnel from core crime fighting, public safety and counterterrorism duties.  This ‘moratorium’ on additional street fairs has helped to maintain safety and security in New York City.  After 12 years of implementing this policy the City decided to reevaluate the policy to determine whether revisions were necessary to serve community needs, while at the same time recognizing NYPD’s continued concerns.

To make this determination, OCECM undertook an extensive review of the current state of street fairs and collected substantial information through:

  • in-person surveys of street fair participants;
  • a general consumer survey open to all;
  • surveys of businesses in case study areas; and
  • outreach to managers and members of business improvement districts and community boards.

Results of Analysis

Impact on Already Congested Areas

In calendar year 2016, approximately 200 street fairs will take place, with the majority located in the borough of Manhattan and concentrated in Community Boards 2, 5 and 7. This disproportionate concentration has several negative effects and does not serve the public interest.  The high number of street fairs in Manhattan increases traffic congestion and burdens on local communities, particularly within Community Board 5 in the vicinity of Times Square.  Multiple street fairs on the same day within the same community board increases the burden on local communities.

Interest in Street Fairs in Boroughs Outside Manhattan

The OCECM surveys identified high public interest in street fairs in boroughs other than Manhattan where residents do not currently have the same access to street fairs.  Furthermore, street fairs have the potential to better support local business development and community building when they are more closely tied to the communities which host them.  Strong public support exists for increasing the representation of neighborhood businesses at street festivals.

The Proposed Rule

Recognizing the significant government interest in broadening access to street festivals by ending the moratorium without overburdening NYPD resources, OCECM proposes an update to the rules governing street events.  Specifically, the proposed rules:

  • redefine street fairs as street festivals to conform to agency permit issuing practices and distinguish between multi-block/multi-day and single-block/single day festivals
  • limit the number of street festival and single block street festival permits that can be issued annually within a community board, within Manhattan, and citywide,
  • require applicants to submit applications for single block street festival permits no later than 90 days prior to the proposed event,
  • establish November 1 through December 31 as the time when applications for street festivals must be submitted for the subsequent year,
  • limit the length of time street events can occur,
  • clarify the definition of community sponsor,
  • require that at least 50% of vendors participating in an event have a business or local presence within the same community board where the street festival or single block street festival occurs, and
  • change the fees imposed for street fairs to a method that reflects the City’s costs related to administration and traffic control for these events.

SAPO authority for these rules is found in section 1043 of the New York City Charter and Executive Order Nos. 100 and 105 of 2007.

Subject: 

Amendment of Street Fair Permit Rules

Location: 
Room A at the Office of Administrative Trials and Hearings
100 Church Street 12th Floor
NY, NY 10007

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Rule

The Mayor’s Office of Citywide Events Coordination and Management (OCECM), which oversees the Street Activity Permit Office (SAPO), has been designated by the Mayor under Local Law 53 of 2016 to administer the rules governing the issuance of permits to hold events in pedestrian plazas created by the Department of Transportation. Section 19-157(d) of the Administrative Code as added by Local Law 53 requires SAPO to issue rules relating to issuance of plaza permits, including rules regarding submission and processing of plaza activity applications, approval or denial of plaza activity applications, appeals of denials of plaza activity permits and fees for use of pedestrian plazas.

The proposed plaza event rules are designed to maximize opportunities for the public to hold events in plazas while also ensuring that the City has advance notice of all plaza events so that events may happen in an orderly fashion while also ensuring that the plazas remain available for everyday use and enjoyment by the public. The proposed rules will govern all events that take place in plazas except for events that have been issued parade, film or construction permits by another City agency.

 

Effective Date: 
Fri, 08/19/2016

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments (View Public Comments Received:3)

Agency:
Comment By: 
Monday, August 8, 2016
Proposed Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Proposed Rule

The Mayor’s Office of Citywide Events Coordination and Management (OCECM), which oversees the Street Activity Permit Office (SAPO), has been designated by the Mayor under Local Law 53 of 2016 to administer the rules governing the issuance of permits to hold events in pedestrian plazas created by the Department of Transportation. As set forth in the Local Law, the designated agency (SAPO) is required to issue rules relating to issuance of plaza permits, including rules regarding submission and processing of plaza activity applications, approval or denial of plaza activity applications, appeals of denials of plaza activity permits and fees for use of pedestrian plazas.

The proposed plaza event rules are designed to maximize opportunities for the public to hold events in plazas while also ensuring that the City has advance notice of all plaza events so that events may happen in an orderly fashion while also ensuring that the plazas remain available for everyday use and enjoyment by the public.  The proposed rules will govern all events that take place in plazas except for events that have been issued parade, film or construction permits by another City agency.

Establishment of Plaza Levels by Size and Other Criteria

The proposed rules create four “levels” for plazas to account for the differences among plazas in Manhattan and plazas in the Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens and Staten Island.  By creating this tiered system, the proposed rules will ensure that events in each plaza are properly managed and some or all of the traffic control costs associated with commercial and fundraising activity are recouped.

The pedestrian plaza levels will be based on size (square footage), number of blocks, and adjacent uses (transportation, civic and commercial activity).  Level A will consist of the largest plazas with multiple adjacent uses, and the levels will range to Level D, which will consist of the smallest plazas with fewer adjacent uses.  Larger plazas with heavy adjacent uses have more pedestrians and vehicular traffic in and around the pedestrian plaza, which requires additional police presence to cover events.  While administrative costs for plaza events are consistent across all levels, police staffing costs vary based on the size of the plaza and its surrounding uses.  Plazas in Manhattan, for example, which have greater pedestrian and vehicular volume, require more police officers to control traffic at and around pedestrian plazas events.  Plazas in the Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens and Staten Island, with smaller pedestrian and vehicular volume require fewer police officers.

Application and Permit Fees

The fees associated with events in plazas were determined by calculating the administrative costs of processing permits and coordinating city agency staff and other resources to ensure that events are properly planned, and the costs of providing police officers to provide traffic and pedestrian control.  The difference in costs and therefore the difference in fees is based on the need for police presence which depends on size and location of plaza events.

Other Changes

The proposed rules also modify some event definitions to more accurately account for their impact on surrounding areas and to assist potential applicants in determining under which category their event falls and what fees they will be required to pay.  The proposed rules also add the definition of Press Conference/Rally/Stationary Demonstration permit to facilitate coordination for these types of events.

Finally, the proposed rule also requires applicants to submit their applications with more time before the event begins to both allow SAPO more time to properly review the application and provide the applicant more time to plan and organize their event. For example, the deadline for submitting applications for small street events is increasing from 10 business days to 30 days. 

SAPO authority for these rules is found in section 1043 of the New York City Charter and Executive Order No. 105 of 2007.

Subject: 

The Street Activity Permit Office (SAPO) of the Office of Citywide Event Coordination and Management (OCECM) is establishing rules for events on Pedestrian Plazas.

Location: 
Office of Administrative Trials and Hearings
100 Church St 12th Floor Hearing Room A
New York, NY 10007
Contact: 

Michael Paul Carey, Executive Director, Office of Citywide Coordination and Management.
Written comments must be received no later than close of business on August 8, 2016.

Download Copy of Proposed Rule (.pdf): 

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Rule

The Mayor’s Office of Citywide Events Coordination and Management (OCECM), which oversees the Street Activity Permit Office (SAPO), administers New York City’s permit system for street activities, block parties and fairs.

Each year SAPO issues permits to over 200 street fairs and over 5,000 other events, most of which include the use of multiple blocks over several days, the erection of structures, the vending of food, apparel and other goods and the use of amplified sound and the performance of music.  Events like these require additional police officers which increases overtime costs to the City.  These events also divert police officers from core crime-fighting, public-safety and counter-terrorism duties.

To more effectively deploy police resources and control overtime costs, the New York City Police Department has requested that SAPO exercise its discretion temporarily to deny permits for additional events scheduled for calendar year 2016.  The proposed rules will authorize SAPO to deny permits to these events if the event was not held in the calendar year 2015. Events that received permits in calendar year 2015 will be eligible to receive permits again in calendar year 2016 so long as the required fees are paid and there were no violations of the 2015 permit.

The Police Department has also requested that SAPO permits be restricted for block closures on side streets in the Times Square area during ongoing construction, which has had a significant impact on traffic in an already congested area. 

In light of the need to effectively deploy police resources and control overtime costs articulated above and the desire to allow opportunities for new street fairs, during calendar year 2016 OCEM will explore options for reallocating the distribution of street fairs during the 2017 calendar year.

In addition, in order to permit adequate time for review, the deadline for applications for special events is being changed from 10 business days to 30 days.  Additional timing allows all parties for proper planning of resources in a more timely manner.  In response to comments received at a public hearing held on November 23, 2015, the 10 business day deadline will continue to apply to extra small and small special events that occupy sidewalk and curb lanes only.  Extra small and small events do not require street closures and demand less processing and coordination of City resources and that will be reflected in the maintenance of the 10 business day deadline for these events.

SAPO authority for these rules is found in section 1043 of the New York City Charter and Executive Order No. 105 of 2007.

Effective Date: 
Fri, 01/01/2016

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments (View Public Comments Received:1)

Agency:
Comment By: 
Monday, November 23, 2015
Proposed Rules Content: 

 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Proposed Rule

The Mayor’s Office of Citywide Events Coordination and Management (OCECM), which oversees the Street Activity Permit Office (SAPO), administers New York City’s permit system for street activities, block parties and fairs.

Each year SAPO issues permits to over 200 street fairs and over 5,000 other events, most of which include the use of multiple blocks over several days, the erection of structures, the vending of food, apparel and other goods and the use of amplified sound and the performance of music.  Events like these require additional police officers which increases overtime costs to the City.  These events also divert police officers from core crime-fighting, public-safety and counter-terrorism duties.

 To more effectively deploy police resources and control overtime costs, the New York City Police Department has requested that SAPO exercise its discretion temporarily to deny permits for additional events scheduled for calendar year 2016.  The proposed rules will authorize SAPO to deny permits to these events if the event was not held in the calendar year 2015. Events that received permits in calendar year 2015 will be eligible to receive permits again in calendar year 2016 so long as the required fees are paid and there were no violations of the 2015 permit.

The Police Department has also requested that SAPO permits be restricted for block closures on side streets in the Times Square area during ongoing construction, which has had a significant impact on traffic in an already congested area. 

In light of the need to effectively deploy police resources and control overtime costs articulated above and the desire to allow opportunities for new street fairs, during calendar year 2016 OCEM will explore options for reallocating the distribution of street fairs during the 2017 calendar year.

In addition, in order to permit adequate time for review, the deadline for applications for special events is being changed from 10 business days to 30 days.  Additional timing allows all parties for proper planning of resources in a more timely manner.

 SAPO authority for these rules is found in section 1043 of the New York City Charter and Executive Order No. 105 of 2007.

Subject: 

Amendment to Impose One-Year Moratorium on New Events, Restrict Activities in Area of Times Sq. and Change Deadline for Special Event Applications

Location: 
Hearing Room A at the Office of Administrative Trials and Hearings
100 Church Street, 12th Floor,
NY, NY 10007

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments (View Public Comments Received:1)

Agency:
Comment By: 
Monday, December 8, 2014
Proposed Rules Content: 

 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Proposed Rule

The Office of Citywide Events Coordination and Management (OCECM), Street Activity Permit Office (SAPO) administers New York City’s permit system for street activities, block parties and fairs.

Each year SAPO issues permits to over 200 street fairs and over 5,000 other events, most of which  include the use of multiple blocks over several days, the erection of structures, the vending of food, apparel and other goods and the use of amplified sound and the performance of music.  Events like these require additional police officers which increases overtime costs to the City.  These events also divert police officers from core crime fighting, public safety and counter terrorism duties.

To more effectively deploy police resources and control overtime costs, the New York City Police Department has requested that SAPO exercise its discretion temporarily to deny permits for additional events scheduled for calendar year 2015.  The proposed rules will authorize SAPO to deny permits to these events only if the event was not held in the calendar year 2014. Events that received permits in calendar year 2014 will be eligible to receive permits again in calendar year 2015.

SAPO authority for these rules is found in section 1043 of the New York City Charter and Executive Order No. 105 of 2007.

 

 

Subject: 

Amendments to extend the existing moratorium on street fair applications to Calendar Year 2015

Location: 
SAPO/Office of Administrative Trials and Hearings
100 Church Street 12 Floor, Hearing Room A
New York, NY 10007
Contact: 

Emil Lissauer
Deputy Executive Director, Citywide Coordination and Management
(212) 788-7567

Download Copy of Proposed Rule (.pdf): 

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Final Rule

The Office of Citywide Events Coordination and Management (OCECM), Street Activity Permit Office (SAPO) is charged with administration of the permit system for street activities, block parties and fairs.

Over two hundred SAPO-permitted street fairs and over 5,000 events occur annually within the City.  Almost all of these events involve permits for the use of multiple blocks over several days, the erection of structures, the vending of food, apparel and other goods and the use of amplified sound and the performance of music.  Such events require additional police presence and increase overtime expenditure by the City.  In order to effectively deploy police resources, the New York City Police Department has requested for the calendar year 2014 that SAPO exercise its discretion temporarily to deny permits for additional events that place an excessive burden on police resources and divert uniformed personnel from core crime fighting, public safety and counter terrorism duties.

In the interests of protecting the City and its inhabitants, these rules will authorize SAPO to deny permits to events scheduled for calendar year 2014, the anticipated effective date of the proposed rules, if the event was not held in the calendar year 2013, the year prior to the effective date of the proposed rules.

SAPO authority for these rules is found in section 1043 of the New York City Charter and Executive Order No. 105 of 2007.

 

Effective Date: 
Thu, 12/26/2013