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Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Rule

 

Section 16-130(b) of the Administrative Code of the City of New York authorizes the Sanitation Commissioner to establish one or more classes of permits for solid waste facilities that receive, process, and store materials consisting of solid waste and recyclable materials.  In addition, section 16-463 authorizes broad oversight over recycling processing facilities that handle paper and cardboard, metal, glass and plastic, as well as scrap metal, including refrigerant containing items. Some facilities operating in New York City limit their operations to the receipt, process and storage of recyclable materials. 

 

 

Currently, recycling processing facilities are either registered or permitted by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation as source-separated non-putrescible solid waste recycling recovery facilities or licensed by the New York City Department of Consumer Affairs as scrap metal processors.  A recycling processing facility is defined as a facility where recyclable materials, other than organic waste, are delivered separately from solid waste or where source-separated recyclable materials, other than organic waste, are processed for the purpose of reuse or sale. Section 16-463 authorizes the Department to provide broad oversight of facilities that handle such materials and to promulgate rules that regulate such facilities. 

 

This rule requires recycling processing facilities to register with the Department and allow for the inspection of site operations to ensure that recyclable materials are effectively processed and accurate records are maintained to capture the flow of recyclable materials handled and processed within the facility.  To further this goal, recycling processing facilities will be required to submit quarterly reports to the Department summarizing the handling of such materials within the target period.  This will allow the Department to more accurately determine the recycling diversion rate within New York City. 

 

 

 

DSNY’s authority for these rules is found in sections 753 and 1043(a) of the New York City Charter and sections 16-130 and 16-463 of the New York City Administrative Code.

Effective Date: 
Mon, 10/24/2016

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments (View Public Comments Received:4)

Agency:
Comment By: 
Thursday, June 16, 2016
Proposed Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Proposed Rule

 

Section 16-130(b) of the Administrative Code of the City of New York authorizes the Sanitation Commissioner to establish one or more classes of permits for solid waste facilities that receive, process, and store materials consisting of solid waste and recyclable materials.  In addition, section 16-463 authorizes broad oversight over recycling processing facilities that handle paper and cardboard, metal, glass and plastic, as well as scrap metal, including refrigerant containing items. Some facilities operating in New York City limit their operations to the receipt, process and storage of recyclable materials. 

 

 

Currently, recycling processing facilities are either registered or permitted by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation as source-separated non-putrescible solid waste recycling recovery facilities or licensed by the New York City Department of Consumer Affairs as scrap metal processors.  A recycling processing facility is defined as a facility where recyclable materials, other than organic waste, are delivered separately from solid waste or where source-separated recyclable materials, other than organic waste, are processed for the purpose of reuse or sale. Section 16-463 authorizes the Department to provide broad oversight of facilities that handle such materials and to promulgate rules that regulate such facilities. 

 

This rule requires recycling processing facilities to register with the Department and allow for the inspection of site operations to ensure that recyclable materials are effectively processed and accurate records are maintained to capture the flow of recyclable materials handled and processed within the facility.  To further this goal, recycling processing facilities will be required to submit quarterly reports to the Department summarizing the handling of such materials within the target period.  This will allow the Department to more accurately determine the recycling diversion rate within New York City. 

 

 

 

DSNY’s authority for these rules is found in sections 753 and 1043(a) of the New York City Charter and sections 16-130 and 16-463 of the New York City Administrative Code.

Subject: 

Proposed Rules Relating to the Registration of Recycling Processing Facilities

Location: 
DSNY Headquarters
125 Worth Street 2nd Floor Auditorium
New York, NY 10013
Contact: 

Madelynn Liguori (646) 885-4786

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

Local Law 65 of 2014 (LL 65) authorizes the Department of Housing Preservation and Development (HPD) to impose a fee to conduct a third complaint-based inspection for a dwelling unit that HPD has inspected twice in the same twelve-month period. For this fee to apply, HPD must have issued a hazardous (class B) or immediately hazardous (class C) violation in the dwelling unit as a result of each such inspection in that period, and the owner must have failed to certify that all of those violations have been corrected.  Under the law, if the fee has not been paid, it becomes a tax lien against the property.   

The new law provides HPD with authority to, by rule:  

(1)  

Increase the fee for such inspections when they are performed during “heat season” (the period of October 1st through May 31st),

 

(2)  

Exclude certain hazardous or immediately hazardous violations from the inspection fee, and

 

(3) Determine what documents HPD would require for an owner to object to the inspection fee. An owner must prove that he/she attempted to access the dwelling unit to make repairs but was unable to do so.  The owner’s objection would be made under the process provided by Administrative Code §27-2129 and related statutes, and HPD’s rules in 28 RCNY Chapter 17.  

The rules provide for a new Chapter 47 to specify which hazardous and immediately hazardous violations would not generate the complaint-based inspection fee.  They also amend 28 RCNY Chapter 17 to describe the documents required for an owner to protest the inspection fee on the basis of lack of access to a dwelling unit to make repairs. The rule also clarifies Chapter 17 to specify that the rules pertaining to objections to charges enforced as tax liens apply to charges incurred under Administrative Code § 27-2091 and 27-2115(k). 

Housing Maintenance Code §27-2008 establishes an owner’s right of access to a tenant’s dwelling unit.  The law authorizes HPD to make rules regarding an owner’s entry to a dwelling unit at a reasonable time and in a reasonable manner.  Under LL 65, an owner would be able to protest a recurring violation inspection fee on the basis of lack of access to a dwelling unit to make repairs.  The rule amends Chapter 25, Subchapter H, §25-101 to clarify and update requirements regarding notification to tenants and the right of access to a dwelling unit at a reasonable time and in a reasonable manner to repair violations and conduct inspections for making improvements and other repairs.  

In addition, Local Law 47 of 2015, which was signed into law by the Mayor on June 2, 2015, provides for owners to notify occupants when certain repairs are to be made to essential services like heat and hot water.  The final rule incorporates those requirements by making conforming amendments to §25-101.

Effective Date: 
Thu, 08/20/2015

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments

Agency:
Comment By: 
Thursday, June 18, 2015
Proposed Rules Content: 

Local Law 65 of 2014 (LL 65) authorizes the Department of Housing Preservation and Development (HPD) to impose a fee to conduct a third complaint-based inspection for a dwelling unit that HPD has inspected twice in the same twelve-month period. For this fee to apply, HPD must have issued a hazardous (class B) or immediately hazardous (class C) violation in the dwelling unit as a result of each such inspection in that period, and the owner must have failed to certify that all of those violations have been corrected.  Under the law, if the fee has not been paid, it becomes a tax lien against the property.   

The new law provides HPD with authority to, by rule:  

(1)  

Increase the fee for such inspections when they are performed during “heat season” (the period of October 1st through May 31st),

 

(2)  

Exclude certain hazardous or immediately hazardous violations from the inspection fee, and

 

(3) Determine what documents HPD would require for an owner to object to the inspection fee. An owner must prove that he/she attempted to access the dwelling unit to make repairs but was unable to do so.  The owner’s objection would be made under the process provided by Administrative Code §27-2129 and related statutes, and HPD’s rules in 28 RCNY Chapter 17.

 

The proposed rules provide for a new Chapter 47 to specify which hazardous and immediately hazardous violations would not generate the complaint-based inspection fee.  They also amend 28 RCNY Chapter 17 to describe the documents required for an owner to protest the inspection fee on the basis of lack of access to a dwelling unit to make repairs.

 

Housing Maintenance Code §27-2008 establishes an owner’s right of access to a tenant’s dwelling unit.  The law authorizes HPD to make rules regarding an owner’s entry to a dwelling unit at a reasonable time and in a reasonable manner.  Under LL 65, an owner would be able to protest a recurring violation inspection fee on the basis of lack of access to a dwelling unit to make repairs.  The proposed rule amends Chapter 25, Subchapter H, §25-01 to clarify and update requirements regarding notification to tenants and the right of access to a dwelling unit at a reasonable time and in a reasonable manner to repair violations and conduct inspections for making improvements and other repairs.

 The proposed rule also makes a clarification to Chapter 17 of Title 28 of the RCNY to specify that the rules pertaining to objections to charges enforced as tax liens apply to charges incurred under § 27-2091.

 

Subject: 

.Rules Relating to Recurring Complaint-Based Inspections

Location: 
NYC Department of Housing Preservation & Development
100 Gold Street Room 5R1
New York, NY 10038
Contact: 

Assistant Commissioner Mario Ferrigno

Download Copy of Proposed Rule (.pdf): 

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Proposed Rule


On December 30, 2013, Local Law 141 was signed by the Mayor.  Local Law 141
amends the Administrative Code of the City of New York, the New York City Plumbing Code, the New York City Building Code, the New York City Mechanical Code and the New York City Fuel Gas Code to bring these codes up to date with the 2009 editions of the International Building, Mechanical, Fuel Gas and Plumbing Codes.  Certain provisions of that local law went into effect immediately. Among them were sections 28-304.6.4, 28-304.6.5 and 28-304.6.6 of the Administrative Code, which deal with elevator inspections and tests.

These provisions changed the timeframe for filing inspection and testing reports as well as certificates of correction.  This change was made to increase industry compliance by providing a more practical and adequate amount of time to correct defects and file a report.  Rule 103-02 is being amended to reflect the new provisions enacted by Local Law 141.

 

 

 

Effective Date: 
Mon, 05/05/2014

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Rule

 

These rules are authorized by Section 2303 of the Charter and Section 19-503 of the New York City Administrative Code. The rule amends the Taxi and Limousine Commission’s For-Hire- Vehicle inspection rules to clarify when a For-Hire-Vehicle is exempt from certain inspection requirements. Under TLC rules, a vehicle with fewer than 500 miles traveled must undergo only a visual inspection and not the more stringent inspections set forth in the NYS Vehicle and Traffic Law or other applicable laws and rules. The rule clarifies that this exemption from the more stringent inspections applies to vehicles of any model year that have fewer than 500 miles traveled at the time of inspection.

 

Effective Date: 
Thu, 11/15/2012

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 



 Click here (.pdf) for the complete text of the adopted rule.



Effective Date: 
Mon, 07/11/2011

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments

Agency:
Comment By: 
Monday, July 30, 2012
Proposed Rules Content: 

 

 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Proposed Rule

 

The proposed rule amends the Taxi and Limousine Commission’s For-Hire-Vehicle inspection rules to clarify when a For-Hire-Vehicle is exempt from certain inspection requirements.  Under the current rules, a vehicle with fewer than 500 miles traveled must undergo only a visual inspection and not the more stringent inspections set forth in the NYS Vehicle and Traffic Law or other applicable laws and rules. The proposed rule clarifies that this exemption from the more stringent inspections applies to vehicles of any model year that have fewer than 500 miles traveled at the time of inspection. The Commission’s authority for this rules change is found in section 2303 of the New York City Charter and section 19-503 of the New York City Administrative Code.

 

 

 

Subject: 

The Taxi and Limousine Commission (“TLC”) is considering amending its For-Hire-Vehicles inspection rules to clarify the existing For-Hire-Vehicle inspection process.

Location: 
Hearing Room
33 Beaver Street, 19th Floor
New York, NY 10004
Contact: 

Taxi and Limousine Commission, Office of Legal Affairs,
33 Beaver Street – 22nd Floor,
New York, New York 10004

Download Copy of Proposed Rule (.pdf):