Public comments for: DOT Notice of Public Hearing and Opportunity to Comment on Proposed Traffic Rules--Horse Drawn Cabs

Comments

Comment:
I have been a resident on 10th Avenue for over 14 years. I am a cyclist, pedestrian, and occasional car driver. I have never, in my life, faced so much danger to commute to and from work - including horse drawn carriages that have NO responsibility to clean up after their animal. Piles of horse shit (although largely flattened by cars) are left behind for cyclists to navigate around. The carriage operators are seen REGULARLY plowing through red lights, turning left on reds, turning right on red lights, and edging their horse into the pedestrian crosswalk in order to give pedestrians a sense of urgency to cross so the horse can cross. It's RIDICULOUS this city allows this barbaric, ancient, and antiquated version of a 'job' to exist. Slave owners did not want to get abolish slavery - should we listen to the horse-carriage industry's argument that they will lose jobs? I do not think so. Learn a new skill, get a new job. It's a public health hazard to allow this industry to have unbridled access to our NYC streets - where pedestrians, pedicab drivers, vehicles, trucks, buses, automobiles, cyclists, and food cart workers ALL compete for street space - and we're gonna let HORSES into this mix??!? WAKE UP NEW YORK CITY!! BAN HORSE CARRIAGE INDUSTRY NOW!!
Agency: DOT
Comment:
Horse and carriage is a historic american icon which truly became NYC icon through the 160 years that have been joy and great memories for millions of people in Central Park. This is a great business for both the operators and the city as well as thousand of men women and children whose lives depend on that business. Therefore the beautiful horses are always taken well care of. People who think the opposite might be either illiterate or have nothing else to-do. As far as the city design goes, the 59th street is well-known with the horse and carriages for long time, there is no traffic issue because of this business. Horses are used for a NYC classic. If horses are bad for some biased people, maybe they should bother NYPD first for using horses in the Police force of NYC
Supporting Document:
Agency: DOT
Comment:
Horse and carriage is a historic american icon which truly became NYC icon through the 160 years that have been joy and great memories for millions of people in Central Park. This is a great business for both the operators and the city as well as thousand of men women and children whose lives depend on that business. Therefore the beautiful horses are always taken well care of. People who think the opposite might be either illiterate or have nothing else to-do. As far as the city design goes, the 59th street is well-known with the horse and carriages for long time, there is no traffic issue because of this business. Horses are used for a NYC classic. If horses are bad for some biased people, maybe they should bother NYPD first for using horses in the Police force of NYC
Supporting Document:
Agency: DOT
Comment:
The proposed changes are detrimental to the carriage horses for the following reasons: 1) They will not be as visible to tourists visiting the city. The business will suffer. 2) The horses will have less access to the current easily available water troughs 3) Horses will be stresses and fatigued by standing them on sloping ground for long periods of time. Furthermore the 72nd street entrance on the West side is extremely crowded with Citibike stands, 4bus stops for M10 and M72, halal food stand, smoothie food stand, B/C subway entrance , bus stop for gray line double decker bus on Central Park West, and tourist buses stopping on 72nd street right opposite The Dakota, and parking for pedicabs. This is a residential neighborhood and it is sometimes very hard to navigate children and dogs through the crowds of tourists.
Agency: DOT
Comment:
As a resident of over 20 years in The Majestic at 115 CPW I have witnessed only an increase in traffic at the W72nd intersection. The W72nd entrance is already the busiest entrance to Central Park, along all of Central Park West, obviously due to it’s two main attractions of The Dakota, and Strawberry Fields. Congesting the area already are: Tour buses double parked on West 72nd Street. Tour buses double parked just north of the bus stop on the NE corner of CPW. Large groups of tourists from the buses in the area photographing The Dakota, and crossing into the Park. Pedicabs already line the entrance - usually about 15 or more as they wait for customers. Citi Bikes were installed on the SE corner of W72nd just two years ago. Popular entry for bicyclist to enter park. Equally popular for runners, people walking dogs. Dogs (even on leash) and horses are dangerous mix. Has the most foot traffic on weekends than all of the other entries (W67th, W77th and W85th - assuming anything North of that makes no sense). The W72nd entry is an already busy access for families on the UWS with children, elderly, and a large amount of dogs. This active intersection is already teaming with busses, pedicabs, bicyclists, Citi Bike users, groups of tourists coming from busses. Adding the horse carriages - with their large imposing carriages and defecating horses is a dangerous, dirty and smelly proposition. I have never seen clean streets or footpaths where the carriages drive, even after they have been supposably cleaned. The pedicabs which many residents see as a nuisance, are at least clean and green. And, if the horse carriages come - what’s next, more street vendors and street acts? W77th Street has none of these above issues. W67 is a good solution since it has a large circular entry/exit. I urge the committee to please reconsider and not use W72 for the horse carriages as it is already a congested area. The Dakota was named, so they say, as it was far north of the bustle of mid-town and lower manhattan and was “way out there in ‘The Dakotas.’ I urge you to retain the neighborhood feel, with the historical Dakota and Majestic at the intersection.
Agency: DOT
Comment:
Please do not change the current horse drawn carriage route or structure. As someone with 30 years in the equine industry, when I have interacted with the carriage drivers it is apparent that the well being of their animals is paramount. They need their partners sound to make a living, and if they are against these changes it is because they will hurt the well being of their animals. Instead of listening to ideas from parties with clear backgrounds of attacking the industry (NYCLASS supported DiBlasio on this issue specifically) perhaps approach the people affected by it to find a way that will work for them instead of against them. Its time we start talking to the actual experts, instead of those who equate feelings with facts.
Agency: DOT
Comment:
Banishing the horses to just the park would not benefit the horses or the business in anyway. Caving in to the animal rights activists would be a loss to all who love horses. Tourists and the horses would miss out on the interactions of just petting or giving carrots. All horses thrive on attention, depriving them of this would benefit no animal loving human and no human loving horse. Please do not believe these protesters care for horses. If they did care they would spend time learning about them.
Agency: DOT
Comment:
The American Horse Council supports the position of NYC carriage operators. See attached.
Agency: DOT
Comment:
I lived and worked in New York for years and travel to NYC as often as possible. The first thing I do when I get to your city is go to the hackline to see the carriage horses, horses that have stood in the essentially same spot for over 150 years. Horses that have proven, even in the face of a brutal campaign to outright ban them, that they are well-cared for and well-regulated. The proposed Amendment to the Traffic Rules to designate specific locations for horse carriage passenger boarding areas in Central Park (Section 4-12(t)) is of serious concern as this could be detrimental to the stability of the carriage horse businesses and will not increase safety or the well-being of the horses: Loss of trade means less money to support the horses and the families that work with them; Loss of the night carriage ride business since few tourists will go inside the park after dark; Lack of easy access to the already existing dedicated water troughs for the horses, which is a serious health concern; Less shade than is currently available. To my mind, this proposed Amendment appears to be nothing more than an attempt to do an end run around the miserably failed ban effort to drive the carriage horse business out of the city - frankly, should this Amendment be implemented, and the carriage horses effectively driven out, I will have no reason to come to the city. A carriage horse transports you to another time and makes a city feel more cozy, knowable, and welcoming. Without them, New York City is just another big city. As a lifelong horsewoman I am very concerned about the future of the urban working horse, the difference between working horses and horses in real need, the New York City carriage industry being actual living history, etc., but what has really struck me is the sheer number of people this Amendment would affect, with no upside for the horses. Not just the owners and drivers, but the stablemen, grooms, farriers, veterinarians, tack and carriage makers, hay and grain suppliers, the farmer that composts the manure, Rosie the carrot lady, and all of their families and communities. That’s hundreds and hundreds of people. And not to mention all the people who would otherwise never get to see a horse in person. These men and women live and breathe horses – this is not just a job, it is an avocation. And it is an avocation for those of us who love to see these horses to support them in any way we can. Please keep the NYC carriage horses where they have been comfortable for over 150 years. I urge you to vote “no” to this ill-advised Amendment. Thank you.
Agency: DOT
Comment:
I think New York should continue to showcase it's ability to mix old and new, taking pride in its carriages and the calming ambiance they bring. Please don't try to hide them in the park, let them stay where they are, for the benefit of tourism, residents, and even the horses themselves.
Agency: DOT

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