Public comments for: Amendment to Child Care Services regarding Care for Children in Shelter (Article 47 of the NYC Health Code)

Comments

Comment:
Please see attached comment on behalf of the NYC Department of Social Services/Department of Homeless Services.
Supporting Document:
Agency: DOHMH
Comment:
Comments from NYC Comptroller Scott M. Stringer.
Supporting Document:
Agency: DOHMH
Comment:
Please see attached for comments from Homeless Services United
Supporting Document:
Agency: DOHMH
Comment:
All children and families, but even more so those in traumatic or unstable living situations, need certain social-emotional supports in place in order to thrive. With the amendment to Article 47, Tier 2 shelter staff can be provided with essential training that will help them better meet the needs of families in their care. Adult caregivers need to be sure their children are left in the care of adequately trained professionals in order to be able to focus on meeting their family’s basic needs. With new regulations for the standard of training shelter based child care professionals receive, the DOHMH will be able to standardize quality to ensure all children are left in the care of personnel who understand and adopt social—emotional learning, family engagement, and play and art based practices that are as enriching as they are therapeutic. As an arts organization serving more than 50,000 low income preschool children and families throughout NYC, Cool Culture believes this amendment is a step in the right direction toward ensuring our city’s earliest, most vulnerable learners, have adequate child care environments in which to learn and grow. Jen Byrd, Program Director, Cool Culture, Brooklyn NY
Agency: DOHMH
Comment:
Attached please find comments from Advocates for Children of New York.
Agency: DOHMH
Comment:
The majority of young children in shelter based child care have experienced early adversity that can leave them at risk for social, emotional and learning challenges. Forward thinking organizations, such as Women in Need, have provided training that gives staff a foundation for supporting healthy development for children in shelters. However, the majority of shelters offer no such support, leaving the most vulnerable children in the care of staff who may inadvertently create caregiving environments that exacerbate stress and trauma. DOHMH's proposal to require professional development in SEL, Parent Engagement and Mental Health First Aid will provide New York City's homeless children with more supportive caregiving environments at a crucial time in their young lives. Lesley Koplow LCSW Director Emotionally Responsive Practice at Bank Street College
Agency: DOHMH
Comment:
The majority of young children in shelter based child care have experienced early adversity that can leave them at risk for social, emotional and learning challenges. Forward thinking organizations, such as Women in Need, have provided training that gives staff a foundation for supporting healthy development for children in shelters. However, the majority of shelters offer no such support, leaving the most vulnerable children in the care of staff who may inadvertently create caregiving environments that exasorbate stress and trauma. DOHMH's proposal to require professional dvelopment in SEL, Parent Engagement and Mental Health First Aid will provide New York City's homeless children with more supportive caregiving environments at a crucial time in their young lives.
Agency: DOHMH