Public comments for: Amendment of Street Fair Permit Rules

Comments

Comment:
These rules are a step in the right direction and wold only benefit from more strict limits on the number of street fairs and the requirement that the fairs and the businesses that are involved come from the community that is being disrupted by them. These fairs block people from accessing their homes, create noise and pollution, and disrupt local businesses that are already struggling with competition from food trucks and street vendors that don't have to keep up with rising rents. I strongly encourage the board to further limit the number of fairs, particularly in already congested Manhattan, and prevent any single neighborhood from being forced to deal with more than one fair in their area a year.
Agency: SAPO
Comment:
The way street fairs are now they are generic and disruptive with little community benefit. If a community cannot manage to attract 50% local business participants, they shouldn't have a fair. Please don't let the fair-managing companies quash this long overdue change.
Agency: SAPO
Comment:
Street festivals foster community relations, serve as a platform for outreach programs (charities, police, fire departments, etc.) I don't think the city should be discriminating who is at the festival (since what the festival contains is a matter of personal taste not an action for the city government to decide on). By reducing the frequency of the festivals it won't change the quality of the festivals themselves. Perhaps the fees and permits for the festivals should be reduce to attract smaller local businesses to represent themselves at the festivals. Perhaps a sliding scale based on annual revenue of the company?
Agency: SAPO
Comment:
I strongly support anything that will reduce the number of street fairs in Manhattan and these new rules seem like a step in the right direction. They make getting around the city nearly impossible while depriving local business of revenue.
Agency: SAPO
Comment:
The proposals to limit the number of street fairs in each community, and--especially--to require that at least half the vendors come from the local neighborhoods, are the best ideas I've heard in quite a while. I walked the full length of the Sept. 18th Columbus Avenue street fair, and was very surprised at how sparsely attended it was, by both vendors and pedestrians. But, by the end of my walk, I understood why. With few exceptions, the same generic vendors had outposts every couple of blocks. . . same products, same signage, same owners. So there was really no reason for anyone to walk through the fair; if you wanted grilled corn on the cob or an iphone case, you could just buy it and leave, knowing that you continued down the avenue, you would just find it again. One of the few busy and interesting booths was a used-book stall set up (probably illegally) on a side street, to benefit that street's block association. At least there was a friendly neighborhood feel to it, and I walked away with a couple of new books. The live music organized by a local bar attracted a good crowd, and a few of the local restaurants that set up tables and chairs in front of their establishments seemed to be doing well. The overall impression was that people were far more interested in experiencing an expansion of what the neighborhood had to offer than in an endlessly repeated parade of generic street fair merchandise. And, of course, when I happened to head a few blocks uptown on Amsterdam later that day. . . there were the exact same vendors at an identical street fair. These fairs have ceased to be a source of pleasure or promotion to the neighborhoods they take place in. Unfortunately, they're only serving the operators. And, who knows, if the focus of the fairs is returned to the neighborhoods, more local vendors might be interested in participating, and more people--from local neighborhoods, and different parts of town--might come out to enjoy them. Best regards, Richard
Agency: SAPO

Pages