Public comments for: Animals (Article 161) and Reportable Diseases and Conditions (Article 11)

Comments

Comment:
I am a licensed veterinarian in NYC. I support the amendment to legalize ferrets. It might also be necessary to add a vaccination for distemper once an appropriate vaccine becomes available again. As already stated, ferrets do not cause more of health risk than the domestic dog or cat. They do have the ability to bite, as do all other pets we keep in our homes. It is up to the owner to properly train and restrain their pets when necessary. Many ferret owners are scared to bring their pet to their vet in fear that they might be taken away or put down. I had a good samaritan bring in a male ferret who was found in carrier, just left in the park. This might have been prevented if resources could have been made available, such as temp boarding or inner city adoptions. Their small size makes them the perfect apart pet. Although they do produce a mild odor, there are many ways to overcome this and they are silent which will not disturb neighbors. How many neighbors complain about dogs barking, or even the occasional meowing. They also do not pose a threat to the local habitat as they believe in California. Ferrets are not equipped to live in the wild for long periods. The threat is also lessened by the fact that most ferrets have been neutered and have short lifespans, so the risk of a wild population is nonexistent. Please pass this amendment to improve the lives of the ferrets already living in our city and increasing the pool of possible adopters of already abandoned ferrets. I know that banning the sale of rabbits will be considered and I would also recommend the same for ferrets. Because they are so small and caged, I fear too many will buy them without properly knowing how to care for them.
Agency: DOHMH
Comment:
continued This happens despite the fact that grooming shops that do not offer boarding are typically different from those that do. Independent grooming shops: crate animals separately at all times, so there is less exposure between dogs in a grooming shop than between dogs walked on the street do not expose pets to the causes of illness that the vaccinations purport to prevent (such as an open wound causing fight or the feces of another dog) The law as it is written is inconsistent and ambiguous and possibly harmful to pets. The American Animal Hospital Association has recently updated their recommended vaccination protocols to prevent over-vaccinating pets but veterinarians are not required to follow these protocols. Some practices require that their clients be vaccinated more often than others to be “up-to-date” on their vaccinations. Clients from such a practice would appear to be out of compliance, while others who see doctors who adhere to recommended protocols would be in compliance, though they both may have been exposed to the same amount of vaccination. Many veterinarians recommend that older pets (14+ years old) stop being vaccinated. Many of these pets still require grooming for optimal health. Pets that are turned away from a grooming shop face health issues caused by untreated or severely matted coats, such as untreated hot spots, hematomas and skin rashes Other pet-related businesses and even city-funded dog parks, which generate far more exposure between pets, do not face this regulation Lastly, if the concern is spreading disease to humans, the law is over-reaching. According to the CDC, there have been 2 cases of animal to human rabies in NY in the past three years and in both of those cases, the person involved was exposed to the animal in other countries (Afghanistan and Ghana).
Agency: DOHMH
Comment:
Grooming businesses should not be required to obtain proof of active vaccinations. Grooming establishments, particularly in NYC, that do not include boarding facilities are almost exclusively small businesses. (The only exceptions are two giant franchised corporations.) Gathering these records puts an undue burden on these businesses, which usually have fewer than 10 employees, by: costing the establishment taxable revenue by forcing them to turn away clients who may have medical or other reasons to reject updated vaccinations (many veterinarians do not recommend older pets continue to be vaccinated, for example) forcing them to increase payroll an estimated $8,000 per year (this figure does not include additional payroll tax) or else abandon other areas of business
Agency: DOHMH
Comment:
Ferrets are NOT dangerous and don't bite. They are very loving and playful pets. I really don't understand why they have such a bad stigma.
Agency: DOHMH
Comment:
I am supporting the action to amend the above mentioned articles to legalize ferrets in New York City. They pose no more a risk to humans than other domesticated animals that are kept as pets, such as dogs and cats, when properly cared for.
Agency: DOHMH

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