Public comments for: LPC Rules Amendment (Revised) 2018

Comments

Comment:
I support the proposed revisions to the Rule changes.
Supporting Document:
Agency: LPC

Public comments for: Rules for MS4 Industrial Stormwater and Construction/Post-Construction Programs

Comments

Comment:
See Attached File
Agency: DEP

Public comments for: DOT Notice of Public Hearing and Opportunity to Comment on Proposed Traffic Rules--Horse Drawn Cabs

Comments

Comment:
Comment submitted on behalf of Rebecca Milvich: If the conduct of the horse carriage industry in the crowd today is an example of a conduct in which they treat the horses and the public, this industry should be ended today! We have witnessed immaturity of delinquent proportions It is a disgrace that New York City is protecting these individuals instead of the ones that live compassionately over investing in bullying mentalities in our community. It's interesting and disgraceful that no one from the industry has even mentioned or apologized for the fact that there was an accident yesterday for a horse collapsed. The individuals here today have even threatened New Yorkers that they will not abide by the laws imposed.
Agency: DOT
Comment:
It is a disgrace that NYC continues to accept and support animal exploitation. NYC should have been the leader in banning horse-drawn carriages altogether. Thankfully other more ethically evolved cities have led the way in finally calling an end to this archaic practice of institutionalized animal cruelty. I am appealing to NYC to immediately put compassion over dollars by stopping this exploitive industry and follow the lead of cities who have done the right thing for our animal friends.
Agency: DOT
Comment:
I have had the privilege to work with the Department of City Planning and the DOT before regarding horse traffic in Prospect Park. It was a productive experience because everyone affected was invited to participate in forming a plan. When I heard about this hearing regarding moving carriage stands in Central Park I was dismayed to hear that the carriage drivers , residents, tourists and Community Boards were never asked to participate. It is no surprise then that the proposed rule change has no consideration for the horses and the businesses that support them. The rule change is supposed to lower the number of hours that horses work in the streets outside the park when in reality it increases the hours horses work on the streets around the outside of the park. In essence the change doesn't not accomplish its goal. While increasing travel hours on streets the rule change adds hardships for both the horses, the businesses and people taking carriage rides. The carriage businesses that support the horses must try to get customers further into the park and past competitors. Customers will have difficulty finding where to get rides especially at night. People with disabilities will not have access as they do now. The proposed stands do not all have sidewalks or level ground or better shade. But I think the best testimony I can offer to your department is from the perspective of my horses who cross a busy traffic circle. Horses are herd animals and creatures of habit. By spilting up the carriage stands to multiple locations and more varied routes is not what a horse wants. Each horse is different some find traffic and more bustle to be comforting some may find activity or the lack of activity in the park to be not be comforting. The only people who can speak for each horse is the driver who works with them. They are telling you this rule change should be rejected and their horses are telling you to reject this rule change through them.
Agency: DOT
Comment:
Although this would move the hack line into the park and away from cars, the proposed rule does not go far enough in easing traffic problems around Central Park, nor does it have a sufficient impact on preventing accidents involving horse drawn carriages. The horses will still be walking through traffic from the stables, which are as far away as 38th Street and 11th Avenue, on their way to Central Park. There will be plenty of opportunities for accidents involving the carriages. The safety of pedestrians and drivers, as well as the horses, will continue to be compromised. The rule also does not address the problem of the drivers making illegal u-turns in the middle of traffic while on cell phones. Any laws regarding the conduct of the drivers in traffic, if they exist, are not enforced, so there will still be the opportunity for accidents involving the horses that could result in injuries, and even fatalities. At a time when the MTA together with the DOT have been working to solve the continuous traffic congestion problem in Midtown, the presence of horse drawn carriages will continue to exacerbate the problem. Even if the hack line is moved into Central Park, that won’t do much for the comfort of the horses, who will still be standing on hard pavement, which will be hot in the summer. They will also continue to walk through heavy vehicular traffic on their way to and from Central Park. I am in favor of anything that might help the horses, so while moving the hack line into the park is better than leaving it on the street among motor vehicles, I am asking the DOT to consider going further with a rule banning the carriages from all New York City Streets.
Agency: DOT
Comment:
I have been a resident of the West 72 street neighborhood since 1957. I have seen the park entrance at West 72nd street get more and more crowded. It has become increasingly more difficult for seniors to navigate the area. With the possibility of horse and buggies coming to the area it will be prohibitive to access the area for people with limited physical abilities. For many people it is the closest entrance to the park, and with this new proposal it will cut off the park entirely. Please do not let this proposal pass!
Agency: DOT
Comment:
I am highly in favor of the proposed rule to move the hack line of carriage horses from Central Park South to inside the park. It is a safety hazard for horses and people to have them on such a busy street. This is a no-brainer. Horses do not belong on the street--they should have at least some protection inside the park. Thank you, Aria Chiodo Astoria, NY
Agency: DOT
Comment:
I am a professor at NYU in the philosophy department, and one of my areas of interest is animal ethics. I am speaking in support of the proposed rule changes. I want to make two brief points. The first is a point about what sort of considerations should be given the most weight in deciding the question whether to approve the proposed plan or not. I want to stress that the issue before us is primarily an ethical issue, and, as such, ethical considerations should be paramount in our thinking about it. The main ethical consideration in play concerns the welfare of the horses. In this online comments section, in arguing against the proposal, several people have appealed to the business interests of the horse cab drivers and of the tourism industry, as well as to the tradition of horse carriage riding in Central Park. But those are not ethical considerations, or, at least, insofar as they are ethically relevant, they are far outweighed by the welfare interests of the horses. Let me give a brief analogy. Suppose there is a foreign country in which the tourism industry and the business interests of a group of people depends on the exploitation of an underprivileged class, e.g., think of forced sex labor of poor women and children; and suppose that this exploitation has been going on for many years. If, in response to a challenge of these exploitative practices, the government of this country were to reply that the practices are part of a long tradition, and that the business interests of the tourist industry and of the people running the establishments in question depend on it, we would not regard this as a satisfactory response or justification, precisely because those considerations are not ethically relevant or not ethically weighty. What is of paramount ethical importance in the imagined scenario is the welfare interests of the exploited group. Similarly, in the situation before us today, what is of paramount ethical importance is the welfare interests of the horses. And since our question (of whether to approve the proposed rule changes or not) is an ethical question, the welfare interests of the horses should be our most important concern overall. My second point is just to reiterate what other people have already said, namely, that, as far as the welfare of the horses is concerned, it is in their best interest for the hack line to be moved inside the park, since this would avoid the risks and stress associated with its current location at Central Park South. From an ethical point of view, the carriage horses should be retired. Since that is unfortunately still not on the agenda, the very least we can do for them is to work on improving their conditions, and moving the hack line into the park is an important step in doing that. We owe it to them, and we owe it to us.
Agency: DOT
Comment:
The Mayor needs to end this ridiculous attack on the NYC Carriage Horses and their hard-working drivers. His relentless pandering to the animal rights zealots is a waste of taxpayer time and money. The Horse Carriages are overwhelmingly supported by tourists AND residents of NYC, and if the mayor had the decency to actually go and see the stables and meet with the stewards he would know that there is no cruelty here. There is no need to move them off of Central Park South: Death By A Thousand Cuts... (which is exactly the way animal rights extremists intend to play this). The mayor should instead be worrying about getting the vagrants and homeless off of 40th & Broadway.
Agency: DOT

Pages