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Human Resources Administration
Codified Title: 
Title 68: Human Resources Administration

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Rule

*Background*

In September 2014, the City launched the Living in Communities (LINC) I, II and III rental assistance programs, targeting families with children in New York City Department of Homeless Services (DHS) and New York City Human Resources Administration (HRA) shelters. These were followed by the LINC IV and V programs for single adults and adult families in shelter or at risk of entry to shelter; the LINC VI program, which provides rental assistance to households in shelter who are able to move in with family and friends; the City Family Eviction Prevention Supplement and City Family Exit Plan Supplement (CITYFEPS) programs; the Special Exit and Prevention Supplement (SEPS) program; and the HRA HOME Tenant-Based Rental Assistance Program (HRA HOME TBRA). In total through July 2018, these programs, together with other City rehousing initiatives, have helped over 97,000 people exit or avoid entering a City shelter.

In September 2017, a so-ordered settlement in the matter of Tejada v. Roberts, Index No. 453245/2015 (Sup. Ct., NY County), paved the way for New York to replace the New York State Family Eviction Prevention Supplement (FEPS) program with an expanded program with higher rent supplement levels, called the Family Homelessness & Eviction Prevention Supplement (FHEPS) program. Many of the families in HRA’s CITYFEPS program and most of the families in the LINC III program were transferred to FHEPS in December 2017.
In order to more effectively and efficiently administer the various City-funded rental assistance programs targeted to households in or at risk of entry to shelter and align City rental assistance more closely with State FHEPS, HRA is now establishing the City Fighting Homelessness and Eviction Prevention Supplement (CityFHEPS), a single streamlined program that will replace the existing LINC I, II, IV and V programs, the SEPS program, and what remains of the LINC III and CITYFEPS programs. HRA has been working to combat source of income discrimination and owners’ resistance to subsidized vouchers in the housing market, and a streamlined program should advance this goal by reducing misinformation and simplifying administration.

Households not currently receiving other City rental assistance who meet the initial eligibility requirements of CityFHEPS will have the opportunity to secure a unit with CityFHEPS as of the effective date of this rule. Households who are currently receiving other City rental assistance will be transferred to CityFHEPS and the old programs will be phased out. With the exception of households currently participating in LINC VI, households participating in the LINC, CITYFEPS and SEPS programs will be transferred to the CityFHEPS program so long as they are income-eligible and continue to reside in the unit towards which their LINC, CITYFEPS or SEPS rental assistance is currently being applied (or they have been approved by HRA to move to a new unit).

*Summary of Provisions*

The new chapter 10 will accomplish the following:
• Set forth definitions relevant to the administration of the new CityFHEPS program.
• Set forth eligibility requirements for city residents. These are different depending on (among other things) whether a household is in shelter.
• Allow for HRA to designate “CityFHEPS qualifying programs” from which it will accept referrals to avert entry to shelter or shorten the stay of a household already in shelter.
• Set forth the maximum monthly rents and rental assistance payment amounts for various types of housing. The maximum apartment rents will be indexed to any annual rent increases set by the NYC Rent Guidelines Board as is the case for the State FHEPS program established pursuant to the settlement in Tejada v. Roberts.
• Set forth renewal criteria beyond the first year of the program, such as allowing renewal beyond five years under certain circumstances as is the case for the State FHEPS program established pursuant to the settlement in Tejada v. Roberts.
• Allow adjustments to be made to the payment amounts when circumstances have changed.
• Provide for an orderly transition from the existing rental assistance programs (LINC, SEPS, and CITYFEPS) to the new CityFHEPS.
• Set forth landlord and participant requirements for continued participation in the program.
• Set forth the review conference and appeal process, and various additional miscellaneous matters, such as the fact that HRA will not maintain a waitlist.

Sections 603 and 1043 of the City Charter and Sections 34, 56, 61, 62, 77, and 131-a of the New York Social Services Law authorize HRA to promulgate this rule.

Effective Date: 
Mon, 10/29/2018

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments (View Public Comments Received:4)

Agency:
Comment By: 
Tuesday, August 21, 2018
Proposed Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Rule

Sections 603 and 1043 of the City Charter, Sections 34, 56, 61, 62, 77, and 131-a of the New York Social Services Law authorize HRA to make this proposed rule.

Background

In September 2014, the City launched the Living in Communities (LINC) I, II and III rental assistance programs, targeting families with children in New York City Department of Homeless Services (DHS) and New York City Human Resources Administration (HRA) shelters.  These were followed by the LINC IV and V programs for single adults and adult families in shelter or at risk of entry to shelter, the LINC VI program, which provides rental assistance to households in shelter who are able to move in with family and friends, the City Family Eviction Prevention Supplement and City Family Exit Plan Supplement (CITYFEPS) programs, the Special Exit and Prevention Supplement (SEPS) program and the HRA HOME Tenant-Based Rental Assistance Program (HRA HOME TBRA).  In total, these programs, together with other City rehousing initiatives, have helped over 87,000 people exit or avoid entering a City shelter. 

In September 2017, the court in Tejada v. Roberts, Index No. 453245/2015 (Sup. Ct., NY County), so-ordered a settlement that paved the way for the New York State Family Eviction Prevention Supplement (FEPS) program to be replaced by an expanded program with higher rent supplement levels called the Family Homelessness & Eviction Prevention Supplement (FHEPS) program.  Many of the families in HRA’s CITYFEPS program and most of the families in the LINC III program were transferred to FHEPS in December 2017.

In order to more effectively and efficiently administer the various City-funded rental assistance programs targeted to households in or at risk of entry to shelter and align City rental assistance more closely with State FHEPS, HRA now proposes CITYFHEPS, a single streamlined program that will replace the existing LINC I, II, IV and V programs, the SEPS program, and what remains of the LINC III and CITYFEPS programs.  HRA is working to combat source of income discrimination and resistance to subsidized vouchers in the housing market, and a streamlined program will advance this goal.

Households not currently receiving other City rental assistance who meet the initial eligibility requirements of CITYFHEPS will have the opportunity to secure a unit with CITYFHEPS as of the effective date of this rule.  Households who are currently receiving other City rental assistance will be transferred to CITYFHEPS and the old programs will be phased out, with no new households enrolling in those programs after the effective date of this rule.* With the exception of households currently participating in LINC VI, households participating in the LINC, CITYFEPS and SEPS programs will be transferred to the CITYFHEPS program so long as they are income-eligible and continue to reside in the unit towards which their LINC, CITYFEPS or SEPS rental assistance is currently being applied (or they have been approved by HRA to move to a new unit).**

Summary of Provisions

The new chapter 10 will accomplish the following:

-- Set forth definitions relevant to the administration of the new CITYFHEPS program.

-- Set forth eligibility requirements for city residents.  These are different depending on (among other things) whether a household is in shelter.

-- Allow for HRA to designate “CITYFHEPS qualifying programs” from which it will accept referrals to avert entry to shelter or shorten the stay of a household already in shelter.

-- Set forth the maximum monthly rents and rental assistance payment amounts for various types of housing.  The maximum apartment rents will be indexed to any annual rent increases set by the NYC Rent Guidelines Board.

-- Set forth renewal criteria beyond the first year of the program, such as allowing renewal beyond five years under certain circumstances.

-- Allow adjustments to be made to the payment amounts when circumstances have changed.

-- Provide for an orderly transition from the existing rental assistance programs (LINC, SEPS, and CITYFEPS) to the new CITYFHEPS.

-- Set forth landlord and participant requirements for continued participation in the program.

-- Set forth the review conference and appeal process, and various additional miscellaneous matters, such as the fact that HRA will not maintain a waitlist.

______________________________________

* As the programs are phased out over the course of the next year, the rules concerning the old programs will be repealed.

** Households currently participating in LINC VI will continue in that program for so long as they remain eligible.  However, no new households will be enrolled in LINC VI.  Instead, households able to move in with host families will have the opportunity to apply to a similar program, called Pathway Home, that HRA is concurrently proposing in a different rule. 

Subject: 

.CITYFHEPS Proposed Rule

Location: 
125 Worth Street
Second Floor Auditorium
New York, NY 10013
Contact: 

929-221-6690

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments (View Public Comments Received:2)

Agency:
Comment By: 
Tuesday, August 21, 2018
Proposed Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose

In connection with the consolidation of many of the City’s rental assistance programs into a single program called CITYFHEPS, HRA is proposing a rule for the Pathway Home Program, which helps households in shelter relocate to housing with friends and family for up to one year while they search for permanent housing. The program is available to households who have been in a New York City Department of Homeless Services shelter for at least 90 days, or who are in a DHS shelter and have a CITYFHEPS certification letter, and who have identified a “host family” willing to host them for up to one year.  Monthly payments to host families will generally range from $1,200 to $1,800 depending on the size of the household that is being hosted.  Under this proposed rule, the program will also be available to certain individuals being discharged from the custody of the New York City Department of Correction.

The LINC VI Family and Friends Reunification Program, which was established two years ago and under which payments are available for up to five years, will no longer be offered to households exiting shelter, but will continue for those already in the program.  Although LINC VI has helped families exit shelter, it is anticipated that Pathway Home’s shorter timeframe and higher monthly payments to hosts will enable more families to leave shelter while providing them with a pathway forward to move into homes of their own.

Subject: 

Pathway Home Proposed Rule

Location: 
125 Worth Street Second Floor Auditorium
New York, NY 10013
Contact: 

929-221-6690

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Rule

The New York City Identification Card Program (“IDNYC Card Program”), first launched in January 2015, is now in its fourth year of operations and includes over a million cardholders. 

In April 2016, the program issued its first set of amendments to the rules governing the program based on its experience in its first year and recommendations from stakeholders, including applicants, advocates, IDNYC enrollment staff and members of the City Council.  Now, based on additional experience and feedback, the IDNYC program is issuing a second set of amendments that will, among other things:

Expand the reach of the card by lowering the minimum age to obtain a card from 14 years of age to 10 years of age.  At the age of 10 or 11, many pre-teens begin walking or taking public transportation to school and other destinations by themselves. The IDNYC card will increase their safety and ease parents’ concerns because, for those under 14, it will include a required field for an emergency contact, which is optional for those 14 and over. This will make it easier for police and other first responders to help children reconnect with their parents in emergency situations.  Applicants under 14 will only be able to apply for the card with a caretaker and their cards will expire two years after issuance instead of the regular expiration date of 5 years after issuance for cardholders 14 years of age and older.

Allow the program, in certain limited instances, to accept data and electronic versions of documents as proof of identity and residency.

Add residency documents for students living in college dormitories.

Clarify IDNYC’s policy of reserving the right to not accept a document that it is unable to verify, even if it appears on a list of IDNYC-accepted documents.  This has always been the policy of IDNYC, but these amendments add a provision explicitly stating that IDNYC reserves the right not to accept any document, or type of document, whose validity it is not able to verify.

Additionally, a number of amendments, including to the section involving the opportunity for a secondary review following denial of an application, are made because of a change in program policy, instituted in January 2017, to no longer scan or otherwise make copies of applicants’ identity and residency documents.

Subsequent to publication of the proposed rule and the public hearing, a number of minor changes were made to enhance clarity, and the rule:

Allows caretakers of 10-13 year old applicants to choose to have the applicant’s address omitted from the card; and

No longer provides that certified translations of documents are accepted, but instead explains that IDNYC will provide free on-site document translation services for applicants who present documents in a language other than English. 

HRA’s authority for this rule may be found in Sections 603 and 1043 of the City Charter, Administrative Code Section 3-115, and Executive Order No. 6 of 2014.

Effective Date: 
Wed, 08/01/2018

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments

Agency:
Comment By: 
Wednesday, June 13, 2018
Proposed Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Proposed Rule

The New York City Identification Card Program (“IDNYC Card Program”), first launched in January 2015, is now in its fourth year of operations and includes over a million cardholders. 

In April 2016, the program issued its first set of amendments to the rules governing the program based on its experience in its first year and recommendations from stakeholders, including applicants, advocates, IDNYC enrollment staff and members of the City Council.  Now, based on additional experience and feedback, the IDNYC program proposes an additional set of amendments to Chapter 6 of the Rules of the City of New York.

These amendments would, among other things:

   

·      Expand the reach of the card by lowering the minimum age to obtain a card from 14 years of age to 10 years of age.  At the age of 10 or 11, many pre-teens begin walking or taking public transportation to school and other destinations by themselves. The IDNYC card would increase their safety and ease parents’ concerns because, for those under 14, it would include a required field for an emergency contact, which is optional for those 14 and over. This makes it easier for police and other first responders to help children reconnect with their parents in emergency situations.  Applicants under 14 could only apply for the card with a caretaker and their cards would expire two years after issuance instead of the regular expiration date of 5 years after issuance for cardholders 14 years of age and older.

·       Allow the program, in certain limited instances, to accept data and electronic versions of documents as proof of identity and residency. 

 ·       Add residency documents for students living in college dormitories.

·       Clarify IDNYC’s policy of reserving the right to not accept a document that it is unable to verify, even if it appears on a list of IDNYC-accepted documents.  This has always been the policy of IDNYC, but the amendments would add a provision explicitly stating that IDNYC reserves the right not to accept any document, or type of document, whose validity it is not able to verify.

Additionally, a number of proposed amendments, including to the section involving the opportunity for a secondary review following denial of an application, reflect or are made as a result of the program’s policy, instituted in January 2017, to no longer scan or otherwise make copies of applicants’ identity and residency documents.

HRA’s authority for this rule may be found in Sections 603 and 1043 of the City Charter, Administrative Code Section 3-115, and Executive Order No. 6 of 2014.

Subject: 

Amendment to IDNYC Rules

Location: 
125 Worth Street 2nd Floor
NY 10013
Contact: 

Nathan Hobelman, 929-221-7668

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments

Agency:
Comment By: 
Thursday, November 17, 2016
Proposed Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Proposed Rule 

HRA is proposing to add a new Chapter 11 to Title 68 of the Rules of the City of New York to improve the way Public and Emergency Assistance payments are made for storage of furniture and personal belongings for eligible persons.  Under the rule, Public Assistance allowances or Emergency Assistance grants for the storage of furniture and personal belongings will be issued when essential, for circumstances such as relocation, eviction, or temporary shelter, subject to certain procedures and restrictions.

The proposed rule authorizes HRA to require a person whose storage fees exceed reasonable and customary amounts to submit three written cost estimates and move his or her possessions to the most cost-effective alternative storage facility or warehouse. A person requesting a storage fees allowance or grant who has not yet placed his or her possessions in storage will also be required to submit three estimates to HRA and utilize the most cost-effective alternative.

The proposed rule also provides that HRA will automate storage payments for eligible Public Assistance recipients residing in New York City Department of Homeless Services (DHS) shelters and HRA domestic violence shelters. For individuals who do not reside in shelters and for shelter residents who are not Public Assistance recipients who apply monthly and are determined eligible for this benefit, HRA will make non-automated payments directly to the storage facility or warehouse.

The proposed rule authorizes HRA to deny payment of late fees if it does not receive storage bills and/or an application for storage payments on a timely basis, without good cause.

Finally, the proposed rule authorizes HRA to deny an application for storage fees when a person:

(i)      does not provide three written estimates when required;

(ii)     seeks to increase the amount of belongings stored when such increase is not essential;

(iii)    cannot demonstrate a continued need for storage fees allowances/grants; or

(iv)    refuses available permanent housing, including offers of supportive housing, without good cause.

This rule is proposed pursuant to the authority of the Commissioner of the New York City Human Resources Administration (HRA) under Sections 603 and 1043 of the New York City Charter, Sections 34, 56, 61, 62, 77, 131, 159, 303(1)(k), and 350-j of the New York Social Services Law, and Sections 352.6(f), 370.3, 372.4, and 397.5(k) of Title 18 of the New York Codes, Rules and Regulations.

Subject: 

Allowance for Essential Storage of Furniture and Personal Belongings.

Location: 
Spector Hall
22 Reade Street first floor
New York, NY 10007
Contact: 
Download Copy of Proposed Rule (.pdf): 

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Rule

 

The New York City Identification Card Program ("IDNYC Card Program") was established to ensure that every New Yorker is provided with the opportunity and peace of mind that come with possessing a government-issued photo identification.  The program was officially launched on January 12, 2015, to immediate and extraordinary public enthusiasm. Less than fifteen months later, the program has enrolled more than 800,000 New Yorkers, and demand remains high.  Some applicants, however, are unable to qualify for the card because their only identity or residency documents are not included in the Rule as acceptable forms of documentation.  Many of these applicants are among those with the greatest need for government-issued photo identification to help them connect with public and private sector services, programs and benefits.

 

In response, IDNYC is expanding and refining the number and types of reliable and verifiable documents that can be accepted as proof of identity and residency. Based on the experience over the past year, and on recommendations from stakeholders, including applicants, advocates, IDNYC enrollment staff, and members of the City Council, the IDNYC program is now proposing revisions and additions to Chapter 6 of Title 68 of the Rules of the City of New York, which contains the rules that govern the IDNYC program.

 

These amendments:

 

  • Expand the number and type of government-issued documents accepted to establish residency, including those issued by U.S. immigration authorities, New York City government programs, and records from an expanded list of hospitals and health care facilities located within New York City;
  • Facilitate access to the card for young people in New York City public schools;
  • Add new categories of caretakers for applicants who are 21 or younger, including recently arrived refugee children and unaccompanied child migrants;
  • Add a new section facilitating the enrollment of physically or mentally impaired individuals who have court-appointed guardians, custodians or conservators;
  • Add provisions enabling the enrollment of applicants recently released from New York State correctional facilities;
  • Expand the categories of government-issued professional and occupational licenses accepted for proof of identity; and
  • Enable applicants to establish residency using documents bearing the name of the spouse or domestic partner with whom they live.

 

HRA's authority for this rule may be found in Sections 603 and 1043 of the City Charter, Administrative Code Section 3-115, and Executive Order No. 6 of 2014.

 

 

Effective Date: 
Mon, 04/25/2016

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments

Agency:
Comment By: 
Thursday, March 10, 2016
Proposed Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose

The New York City Identification Card Program (“IDNYC Card Program”) was established to ensure that every New Yorker is provided with the opportunity and peace of mind that come with possessing a government-issued photo identification.  The program was officially launched on January 12, 2015, to immediate and extraordinary public enthusiasm. One year later, the program has enrolled more than 730,000 New Yorkers, and demand remains high.  Some applicants, however, are unable to qualify for the card because their only identity or residency documents are not included in the Rule as acceptable forms of documentation.  Many of these applicants are among those with the greatest need for government-issued photo identification to help them connect with public and private sector services, programs and benefits.

In response, IDNYC seeks to expand and refine the number and types of reliable and verifiable documents that can be accepted as proof of identity and residency. Based on the experience over the past year, and on recommendations from stakeholders, including applicants, advocates, IDNYC enrollment staff, and members of the City Council, the IDNYC program is now proposing revisions and additions to Chapter 6 of the Rules of the City of New York, which contains the rules that govern the IDNYC program.

These proposed amendments:

  • Expand the number and type of government-issued documents accepted to establish residency, including those issued by U.S. immigration authorities, New York City government programs, and records from an expanded list of hospitals and health care facilities located within New York City;
  • Facilitate access to the card for young people in New York City public schools;
  • Add new categories of caretakers for applicants who are 21 or younger, including recently arrived refugee children and unaccompanied child migrants;
  • Add a new section facilitating the enrollment of physically or mentally impaired individuals who have court-appointed guardians, custodians or conservators;
  • Add provisions enabling the enrollment of applicants recently released from New York State correctional facilities;
  • Expand the categories of government-issued professional and occupational licenses accepted for proof of identity; and
  • Enable applicants to establish residency using documents bearing the name of the spouse or domestic partner with whom they live.

HRA’s authority for this rule may be found in Sections 603 and 1043 of the City Charter, Administrative Code Section 3-115, and Executive Order No. 6 of 2014.

Subject: 

Amendments to IDNYC Rules.

Location: 
Spector Hall
22 Reade Street
New York, NY 10007-1216
Contact: 

929-221-0051; IDNYCRULE@hra.nyc.gov

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose

 

In order to implement the Mayor’s priority of preventing homelessness and moving households from shelter into stable housing, and in a joint effort with the Commissioner of the New York City Department of Homeless Services (DHS), the Commissioner of the New York City Human Resources Administration (HRA) issues this rule amending Chapters 7 and 8 of Title 68 of the Rules of the City of New York to authorize HRA to:

 

(1)  make the Living in Communities Family and Friend Reunification Rental Assistance Program (LINC VI) available to homeless single adults and adult families without minor children.   By expanding the eligibility criteria for LINC VI to include homeless single adults and adult families, HRA and DHS will help additional households relocate to housing with families and friends in the community. This expansion of LINC VI provides an important new option for homeless single adults and adult families that will increase the number of exits from and reduce the number of entries to shelter, helping to address and alleviate demands on the shelter system.

 

(2)  allow households in receipt of LINC VI to receive LINC I, II, III, IV, or V rental assistance or CITYFEPS rent supplements if such households otherwise meet initial eligibility requirements for such programs but for the fact that they are not currently residing in shelter.  With this change, households that may be able to stay temporarily with host families will not lose the opportunity to obtain other forms of rental assistance, and they will also be able to exit shelter while they search for stable, long-term housing.  This change will increase participation in the LINC VI program and ultimately increase households’ ability to avoid re-entry into shelter. 

 

These amendments were implemented via an emergency rule that was issued on September 2, 2015.  A proposed rule to make the program permanent was published on November 2, 2015.  The final rule includes some additional technical amendments but does not otherwise differ from the proposed rule.

 

HRA’s authority for this rule may be found in sections 34, 56, 61, 62, 77, and 131 of the New York Social Services Law and sections 603 and 1043 of the New York City Charter. 

 

Effective Date: 
Fri, 01/29/2016

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Rule

In order to implement the Mayor’s priority of assisting families and individuals experiencing homelessness in securing and maintaining stable and permanent housing in the community, the Commissioner of the New York City Human Resources Administration (HRA) adds Chapter 9 to Title 68 of the Rules of the City of New York to continue implementation of the HRA HOME Tenant-Based Rental Assistance (HRA HOME TBRA) Program. The program, which was established by emergency rule issued on July 31, 2015, will provide rental assistance to a limited number of families with children, adult families and pregnant women currently residing in New York City Department of Homeless Services (DHS) and HRA shelters, as well as chronically street homeless individuals. To be eligible, households must be in receipt of supplemental security income, social security disability insurance benefits, social security survivors insurance benefits or social security retirement benefits.  This rule is substantially similar to the proposed final rule that was published for public comment, but includes a number of technical or clarifying revisions, including adding the rule’s provisions to Chapter 9 rather than Chapter 10, and clarifying that HRA’s administrative appeals process is not available to challenge determinations based on lack of funding for the HRA HOME TBRA program.

There is an urgent need for this program.  Shelter census data shows that the number of families with children and adult families in the DHS shelter system remains extremely high, even taking into account the hundreds of families who have already been able to leave shelter under existing HRA rental assistance programs.

Specifically, between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2013 the number of families with children in the DHS shelter system increased by 63 percent, including an 80 percent increase in the number of children. Similarly, the number of adult families in the DHS shelter system increased by 59 percent between July 1, 2004 and December 31, 2013.

As of November 10, 2015, there were 12,082 families with children in the DHS shelter system, including 23,462 children, as well as 2,170 adult families, comprised of 4,544 individuals.  As shelter census has increased, the DHS shelter system has continued to experience extremely low vacancy rates. Indeed, on September 23, 2015, the vacancy rate for shelters for families with children was 0.84 percent and the vacancy rate for adult family shelters was 0.48 percent.

Census data also demonstrates the urgent need for an additional program available to chronically street homeless individuals. In addition to the men and women in DHS shelters for single adults and adult families, the City estimates that as of January 2015 there were over 3,000 unsheltered individuals living on the streets, in parks, and in other public spaces of the City, including the subway system.

Finally, shelter census data also shows the urgent need for a rental assistance program targeted to those in receipt of various forms of social security benefits.  Households in receipt of such benefits comprise approximately 24 percent of the families with children and approximately 40 percent of the adult families in the City shelter system. A number of individuals served in DHS Street Homeless Programs who are in receipt of social security benefits may also benefit from this program.

Over a two-year period, the HRA HOME TBRA Program will assist approximately 1,250 households to obtain permanent housing and become securely housed in the community.  

HRA’s authority for this rule may be found in Sections 92.205 and 92.209 of Title 24 of the Code of Federal Regulations; the City of New York’s Consolidated Plan, promulgated pursuant to Part 91 of Title 24 of the Code of Federal Regulations and approved by the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development on May 29, 2015; Sections 34, 56, 61, 62, 77, and 131 of the New York Social Services Law; and Sections 603 and 1043 of the New York City Charter. 

Effective Date: 
Mon, 11/30/2015

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