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Human Resources Administration
Codified Title: 
Title 68: Human Resources Administration

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments

Agency:
Comment By: 
Thursday, November 17, 2016
Proposed Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Proposed Rule 

HRA is proposing to add a new Chapter 11 to Title 68 of the Rules of the City of New York to improve the way Public and Emergency Assistance payments are made for storage of furniture and personal belongings for eligible persons.  Under the rule, Public Assistance allowances or Emergency Assistance grants for the storage of furniture and personal belongings will be issued when essential, for circumstances such as relocation, eviction, or temporary shelter, subject to certain procedures and restrictions.

The proposed rule authorizes HRA to require a person whose storage fees exceed reasonable and customary amounts to submit three written cost estimates and move his or her possessions to the most cost-effective alternative storage facility or warehouse. A person requesting a storage fees allowance or grant who has not yet placed his or her possessions in storage will also be required to submit three estimates to HRA and utilize the most cost-effective alternative.

The proposed rule also provides that HRA will automate storage payments for eligible Public Assistance recipients residing in New York City Department of Homeless Services (DHS) shelters and HRA domestic violence shelters. For individuals who do not reside in shelters and for shelter residents who are not Public Assistance recipients who apply monthly and are determined eligible for this benefit, HRA will make non-automated payments directly to the storage facility or warehouse.

The proposed rule authorizes HRA to deny payment of late fees if it does not receive storage bills and/or an application for storage payments on a timely basis, without good cause.

Finally, the proposed rule authorizes HRA to deny an application for storage fees when a person:

(i)      does not provide three written estimates when required;

(ii)     seeks to increase the amount of belongings stored when such increase is not essential;

(iii)    cannot demonstrate a continued need for storage fees allowances/grants; or

(iv)    refuses available permanent housing, including offers of supportive housing, without good cause.

This rule is proposed pursuant to the authority of the Commissioner of the New York City Human Resources Administration (HRA) under Sections 603 and 1043 of the New York City Charter, Sections 34, 56, 61, 62, 77, 131, 159, 303(1)(k), and 350-j of the New York Social Services Law, and Sections 352.6(f), 370.3, 372.4, and 397.5(k) of Title 18 of the New York Codes, Rules and Regulations.

Subject: 

Allowance for Essential Storage of Furniture and Personal Belongings.

Location: 
Spector Hall
22 Reade Street first floor
New York, NY 10007
Contact: 
Download Copy of Proposed Rule (.pdf): 

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Rule

 

The New York City Identification Card Program ("IDNYC Card Program") was established to ensure that every New Yorker is provided with the opportunity and peace of mind that come with possessing a government-issued photo identification.  The program was officially launched on January 12, 2015, to immediate and extraordinary public enthusiasm. Less than fifteen months later, the program has enrolled more than 800,000 New Yorkers, and demand remains high.  Some applicants, however, are unable to qualify for the card because their only identity or residency documents are not included in the Rule as acceptable forms of documentation.  Many of these applicants are among those with the greatest need for government-issued photo identification to help them connect with public and private sector services, programs and benefits.

 

In response, IDNYC is expanding and refining the number and types of reliable and verifiable documents that can be accepted as proof of identity and residency. Based on the experience over the past year, and on recommendations from stakeholders, including applicants, advocates, IDNYC enrollment staff, and members of the City Council, the IDNYC program is now proposing revisions and additions to Chapter 6 of Title 68 of the Rules of the City of New York, which contains the rules that govern the IDNYC program.

 

These amendments:

 

  • Expand the number and type of government-issued documents accepted to establish residency, including those issued by U.S. immigration authorities, New York City government programs, and records from an expanded list of hospitals and health care facilities located within New York City;
  • Facilitate access to the card for young people in New York City public schools;
  • Add new categories of caretakers for applicants who are 21 or younger, including recently arrived refugee children and unaccompanied child migrants;
  • Add a new section facilitating the enrollment of physically or mentally impaired individuals who have court-appointed guardians, custodians or conservators;
  • Add provisions enabling the enrollment of applicants recently released from New York State correctional facilities;
  • Expand the categories of government-issued professional and occupational licenses accepted for proof of identity; and
  • Enable applicants to establish residency using documents bearing the name of the spouse or domestic partner with whom they live.

 

HRA's authority for this rule may be found in Sections 603 and 1043 of the City Charter, Administrative Code Section 3-115, and Executive Order No. 6 of 2014.

 

 

Effective Date: 
Mon, 04/25/2016

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments

Agency:
Comment By: 
Thursday, March 10, 2016
Proposed Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose

The New York City Identification Card Program (“IDNYC Card Program”) was established to ensure that every New Yorker is provided with the opportunity and peace of mind that come with possessing a government-issued photo identification.  The program was officially launched on January 12, 2015, to immediate and extraordinary public enthusiasm. One year later, the program has enrolled more than 730,000 New Yorkers, and demand remains high.  Some applicants, however, are unable to qualify for the card because their only identity or residency documents are not included in the Rule as acceptable forms of documentation.  Many of these applicants are among those with the greatest need for government-issued photo identification to help them connect with public and private sector services, programs and benefits.

In response, IDNYC seeks to expand and refine the number and types of reliable and verifiable documents that can be accepted as proof of identity and residency. Based on the experience over the past year, and on recommendations from stakeholders, including applicants, advocates, IDNYC enrollment staff, and members of the City Council, the IDNYC program is now proposing revisions and additions to Chapter 6 of the Rules of the City of New York, which contains the rules that govern the IDNYC program.

These proposed amendments:

  • Expand the number and type of government-issued documents accepted to establish residency, including those issued by U.S. immigration authorities, New York City government programs, and records from an expanded list of hospitals and health care facilities located within New York City;
  • Facilitate access to the card for young people in New York City public schools;
  • Add new categories of caretakers for applicants who are 21 or younger, including recently arrived refugee children and unaccompanied child migrants;
  • Add a new section facilitating the enrollment of physically or mentally impaired individuals who have court-appointed guardians, custodians or conservators;
  • Add provisions enabling the enrollment of applicants recently released from New York State correctional facilities;
  • Expand the categories of government-issued professional and occupational licenses accepted for proof of identity; and
  • Enable applicants to establish residency using documents bearing the name of the spouse or domestic partner with whom they live.

HRA’s authority for this rule may be found in Sections 603 and 1043 of the City Charter, Administrative Code Section 3-115, and Executive Order No. 6 of 2014.

Subject: 

Amendments to IDNYC Rules.

Location: 
Spector Hall
22 Reade Street
New York, NY 10007-1216
Contact: 

929-221-0051; IDNYCRULE@hra.nyc.gov

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose

 

In order to implement the Mayor’s priority of preventing homelessness and moving households from shelter into stable housing, and in a joint effort with the Commissioner of the New York City Department of Homeless Services (DHS), the Commissioner of the New York City Human Resources Administration (HRA) issues this rule amending Chapters 7 and 8 of Title 68 of the Rules of the City of New York to authorize HRA to:

 

(1)  make the Living in Communities Family and Friend Reunification Rental Assistance Program (LINC VI) available to homeless single adults and adult families without minor children.   By expanding the eligibility criteria for LINC VI to include homeless single adults and adult families, HRA and DHS will help additional households relocate to housing with families and friends in the community. This expansion of LINC VI provides an important new option for homeless single adults and adult families that will increase the number of exits from and reduce the number of entries to shelter, helping to address and alleviate demands on the shelter system.

 

(2)  allow households in receipt of LINC VI to receive LINC I, II, III, IV, or V rental assistance or CITYFEPS rent supplements if such households otherwise meet initial eligibility requirements for such programs but for the fact that they are not currently residing in shelter.  With this change, households that may be able to stay temporarily with host families will not lose the opportunity to obtain other forms of rental assistance, and they will also be able to exit shelter while they search for stable, long-term housing.  This change will increase participation in the LINC VI program and ultimately increase households’ ability to avoid re-entry into shelter. 

 

These amendments were implemented via an emergency rule that was issued on September 2, 2015.  A proposed rule to make the program permanent was published on November 2, 2015.  The final rule includes some additional technical amendments but does not otherwise differ from the proposed rule.

 

HRA’s authority for this rule may be found in sections 34, 56, 61, 62, 77, and 131 of the New York Social Services Law and sections 603 and 1043 of the New York City Charter. 

 

Effective Date: 
Fri, 01/29/2016

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Rule

In order to implement the Mayor’s priority of assisting families and individuals experiencing homelessness in securing and maintaining stable and permanent housing in the community, the Commissioner of the New York City Human Resources Administration (HRA) adds Chapter 9 to Title 68 of the Rules of the City of New York to continue implementation of the HRA HOME Tenant-Based Rental Assistance (HRA HOME TBRA) Program. The program, which was established by emergency rule issued on July 31, 2015, will provide rental assistance to a limited number of families with children, adult families and pregnant women currently residing in New York City Department of Homeless Services (DHS) and HRA shelters, as well as chronically street homeless individuals. To be eligible, households must be in receipt of supplemental security income, social security disability insurance benefits, social security survivors insurance benefits or social security retirement benefits.  This rule is substantially similar to the proposed final rule that was published for public comment, but includes a number of technical or clarifying revisions, including adding the rule’s provisions to Chapter 9 rather than Chapter 10, and clarifying that HRA’s administrative appeals process is not available to challenge determinations based on lack of funding for the HRA HOME TBRA program.

There is an urgent need for this program.  Shelter census data shows that the number of families with children and adult families in the DHS shelter system remains extremely high, even taking into account the hundreds of families who have already been able to leave shelter under existing HRA rental assistance programs.

Specifically, between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2013 the number of families with children in the DHS shelter system increased by 63 percent, including an 80 percent increase in the number of children. Similarly, the number of adult families in the DHS shelter system increased by 59 percent between July 1, 2004 and December 31, 2013.

As of November 10, 2015, there were 12,082 families with children in the DHS shelter system, including 23,462 children, as well as 2,170 adult families, comprised of 4,544 individuals.  As shelter census has increased, the DHS shelter system has continued to experience extremely low vacancy rates. Indeed, on September 23, 2015, the vacancy rate for shelters for families with children was 0.84 percent and the vacancy rate for adult family shelters was 0.48 percent.

Census data also demonstrates the urgent need for an additional program available to chronically street homeless individuals. In addition to the men and women in DHS shelters for single adults and adult families, the City estimates that as of January 2015 there were over 3,000 unsheltered individuals living on the streets, in parks, and in other public spaces of the City, including the subway system.

Finally, shelter census data also shows the urgent need for a rental assistance program targeted to those in receipt of various forms of social security benefits.  Households in receipt of such benefits comprise approximately 24 percent of the families with children and approximately 40 percent of the adult families in the City shelter system. A number of individuals served in DHS Street Homeless Programs who are in receipt of social security benefits may also benefit from this program.

Over a two-year period, the HRA HOME TBRA Program will assist approximately 1,250 households to obtain permanent housing and become securely housed in the community.  

HRA’s authority for this rule may be found in Sections 92.205 and 92.209 of Title 24 of the Code of Federal Regulations; the City of New York’s Consolidated Plan, promulgated pursuant to Part 91 of Title 24 of the Code of Federal Regulations and approved by the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development on May 29, 2015; Sections 34, 56, 61, 62, 77, and 131 of the New York Social Services Law; and Sections 603 and 1043 of the New York City Charter. 

Effective Date: 
Mon, 11/30/2015

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose

In order to implement the Mayor’s priority of preventing homelessness and moving adults from shelter into stable housing, in a joint effort with the Commissioner of the Department of Homeless Services (DHS), the Commissioner of the New York City Human Resources Administration (HRA) amends Chapter 8 of Title 68 of the Rules of the City of New York to continue the implementation of a new rental assistance program.  The Special Exit and Prevention Supplement (“SEPS”) program, which was established by emergency rule issued on August 26, 2015, is available to certain single adults and adult families who are homeless or at risk of homelessness, including veterans, those who have lost or are losing housing as a result of an eviction proceeding, a foreclosure proceeding, a City agency vacate order, or for health and safety reasons, adults in DHS shelter who were in foster care or a residential institutional facility prior to entering shelter, and survivors of domestic violence who have reached their maximum length of stay in HRA shelter or who are in DHS shelter, but have not refused placement in an HRA shelter.  A proposed rule to make the program permanent was published on October 16, 2015.  The only non-technical change that has been made from the proposed rule is that this final rule gives HRA the ability to change the time period in which single adults currently in DHS shelter must have resided in shelter to be eligible for the program.

The need for the SEPS program is established by census data from DHS showing that the number of single adults and adult families in the DHS shelter system remains high, while the DHS shelter system for these populations experiences low vacancy rates.  

Specifically, between July 1, 2004 and December 31, 2013, the number of adult families in the DHS shelter system increased by 59 percent. Similarly, there was a 20 percent increase in the average daily census for single adults during the same time period.

As of November 13, 2015, 17,246 individuals in total were in DHS shelters for single adults and adult families. As shelter census has increased, the DHS shelter system has continued to experience extremely low vacancy rates. For example, on October 9, 2015, the vacancy rate for adult family shelters was 0.11 percent and the vacancy rate for single adult shelters was 0.7 percent.

Further, the City is currently faced with the critical need to find stable housing for hundreds of individuals who have been required to leave “three-quarter housing” for health and safety reasons.  Many of these individuals are currently occupying temporary housing pending relocation to permanent housing and are at risk of shelter entry if permanent, affordable housing cannot be found.  SEPS is urgently needed to provide rental assistance for many of these individuals to enable them to avoid entry into the DHS shelter system and relocate to stable housing.

SEPS provides an important new option for single adults and adult families who are homeless or at risk of homelessness that will allow more people to move from shelter to stable housing and decrease the number of entries to shelter, helping to reduce demands on the shelter system.

HRA’s authority for this rule may be found in sections 34, 56, 61, 62, 77, and 131 of the New York Social Services Law, sections 603 and 1043 of the New York City Charter, and section 352.6 of title 18 of the New York Codes, Rules and Regulations.  

 

Effective Date: 
Thu, 12/24/2015

Adopted Rules: Closed to Comments

Adopted Rules Content: 

 

Statement of Basis and Purpose

 

 

 

To implement the Mayor’s priority of preventing homelessness and moving households into stable housing, and in a joint effort with the Commissioner of the New York City Department of Homeless Services (DHS), the Commissioner of the New York City Human Resources Administration (HRA) makes various changes to the Living in Communities (LINC) Rental Assistance Programs and the City Family Eviction Prevention Supplement and City Family Exit Plan Supplement (CITYFEPS) Programs.  Specifically, HRA makes the following amendments to Chapters 7 and 8 of Title 68 of the Rules of the City of New York:

 

 

 

·         Authorize HRA to increase the maximum rents in the LINC I, LINC II, LINC III, LINC IV, LINC V and CITYFEPS programs for households with five or more individuals where HRA has determined that they are unlikely to secure housing within the next 90 days at the rents otherwise permitted under the rule.  (See sections 4, 5, 11 and 18 of the rule.)  These amendments allow HRA to continue to ensure that existing rental assistance programs can compete in the New York real estate market.

 

 

 

·         Authorize HRA to pay one year of rental assistance payments in advance to a landlord who has entered into a lease with a program participant for a unit that was used as DHS shelter immediately prior to lease signing. (See sections 4, 6, 11 and 17 of the rule.)  The ability of HRA to offer upfront payments in connection with rental assistance programs provides an incentive to landlords to accept LINC and CITYFEPS payments for units currently used as DHS shelter, which decreases the number of households living in DHS shelter while returning much needed affordable housing units to the New York City housing market.  When such units are currently occupied by households that are eligible for LINC or CITYFEPS, landlords have an incentive to enter into leases with those households, permitting the households to exit shelter while remaining in the same housing units. This provides more stability for such households and avoids the need to transfer them to other shelter placements while they search for available apartments.

 

 

 

·         Extend LINC I, II, III and VI, which are currently limited to families with children, to pregnant women. (See sections 1-3, 7 and 14 of the rule.) These amendments allow otherwise eligible households consisting solely of a pregnant woman to participate in the LINC I, II, III and VI programs, rather than having to wait until after the birth of the baby to move from shelter into housing to which LINC rental assistance can be applied. (The other HRA rental assistance programs targeted to families with children are already available to households consisting solely of a pregnant woman.)

 

 

 

·         Increase the time within which someone may appeal from a hearing officer’s decision from five business days from delivery of the decision to fifteen business days from when HRA sends the decision. (See sections 8, 12, 15 and 19 of the rule.)

 

 

 

·         Clarify that heat and hot water must be included in rent. (See sections 9, 13 and 20 of the rule.)

 

 

 

·         Clarify that any residence towards which LINC I, II or III rental assistance is applied must be located within New York City.  (See section 10 of the rule.) (The rules governing LINC IV, V and VI and CITYFEPS already include provisions limiting rental assistance to residences located within New York City.)

 

In addition, the rule includes a number of technical amendments to the provisions describing how rental assistance amounts and program participant contributions are calculated. (See sections 4, 7 and 11 of the rule.) 

HRA’s authority for this rule is provided by sections 34, 56, 61, 62, 77, and 131 of the New York Social Services Law and sections 603 and 1043 of the New York City Charter. 

Effective Date: 
Thu, 11/19/2015

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments

Agency:
Comment By: 
Friday, December 11, 2015
Proposed Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Proposed Rule

 

In order to implement the Mayor’s priority of preventing homelessness and moving households from shelter into stable housing, and in a joint effort with the Commissioner of the New York City Department of Homeless Services (DHS), the Commissioner of the New York City Human Resources Administration (HRA) issues this proposed rule amending Chapter 7 of Title 68 of the Rules of the City of New York to authorize HRA to:

 

(1)  make the Living in Communities Family and Friend Reunification Rental Assistance Program (LINC VI) available to homeless single adults and adult families without minor children.   By expanding the eligibility criteria for LINC VI to include homeless single adults and adult families, HRA and DHS will help additional households relocate to housing with families and friends in the community. This expansion of LINC VI provides an important new option for homeless single adults and adult families that will increase the number of exits from and reduce the number of entries to shelter, helping to address and alleviate demands on the shelter system.

 

 

(2)  allow households in receipt of LINC VI to receive LINC I, II, III, IV, or V rental assistance or CITYFEPS rent supplements if such households otherwise meet initial eligibility requirements for such programs but for the fact that they are not currently residing in shelter.  With this change, households that may be able to stay temporarily with host families will not lose the opportunity to obtain other forms of rental assistance, and they will also be able to exit shelter while they search for stable, long-term housing.  This change will increase participation in the LINC VI program and ultimately increase households’ ability to avoid re-entry into shelter. 

 

These amendments are currently being implemented via an emergency rule that was issued on September 2, 2015.  This proposed rule, if adopted, will make these changes permanent.

 

HRA’s authority for this proposed rule may be found in sections 34, 56, 61, 62, 77, and 131 of the New York Social Services Law and sections 603 and 1043 of the New York City Charter. 

 

Subject: 

Amendment of LINC VI Program

Location: 
Spector Hall
22 Reade Street, First Floor
New York, NY 10007
Contact: 
Download Copy of Proposed Rule (.pdf): 

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments (View Public Comments Received:2)

Agency:
Comment By: 
Tuesday, November 17, 2015
Proposed Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Proposed Rule

 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Rule

 

In order to implement the Mayor’s priority of preventing homelessness and moving adults from shelter into stable housing, in a joint effort with the Commissioner of the Department of Homeless Services (DHS), the Commissioner of the New York City Human Resources Administration (HRA) proposes to amend Chapter 8 of Title 68 of the Rules of the City of New York to continue the implementation of a new rental assistance program.  The Special Exit and Prevention Supplement (“SEPS”) program, which was established by emergency rule issued on August 26, 2015, is available to certain single adults and adult families who are homeless or at risk of homelessness, including veterans, adults who are residing in DHS shelters who have lost or are losing housing as a result of an eviction proceeding, a foreclosure proceeding, a City agency vacate order, or for health and safety reasons, or who were in a residential institutional facility prior to entering shelter, or who have been certified by HRA as survivors of domestic violence.

 

This proposed rule differs from the emergency rule establishing the SEPS program in the following ways:

 

·         This proposed rule does not include a requirement, included in the emergency rule, that veterans currently in single adult shelters have resided in shelter at some point between May 1, 2015 and July 31, 2015; 

 

·         Consistent with an emergency rule issued on September 2, 2015, the proposed rule allows a household in receipt of rental assistance under the Living in Communities (“LINC”) VI program to receive SEPS if the household meets the initial eligibility requirements for SEPS, except for the requirement that the household currently reside in shelter;  

 

·         Consistent with corresponding amendments to the LINC programs and the City Family Eviction Prevention Supplement Program and the City Family Exit Plan Supplement Program (“CITYFEPS programs”), this proposed rule includes provisions authorizing HRA to: (1) increase the maximum rents for households with five or more individuals where HRA has determined that they are unlikely to secure housing within the next 90 days at the rents otherwise permitted in the programs; and (2) pay one year of rental assistance payments in advance to a landlord who has entered into a lease with a program participant for a unit that was used as DHS shelter immediately prior to lease signing.  Additionally, consistent with the amendments to the LINC and CITYFEPS programs, this proposed rule clarifies how the rent supplement amount is calculated; and

 

·         This proposed rule includes minor technical (non-substantive) amendments clarifying the timeframe for requesting a review conference or administrative appeal.

 

The continued need for the SEPS program is established by census data from DHS showing that the number of single adults and adult families in the DHS shelter system remains high, while the DHS shelter system for these populations experiences low vacancy rates. 

 

Specifically, between July 1, 2004 and December 31, 2013, the number of adult families in the DHS shelter system increased by 59 percent. Similarly, there was a 20 percent increase in the average daily census for single adults during the same time period.  As of October 9, 2015, 16,860 individuals in total were in DHS shelters for single adults and adult families.

 

As shelter census has increased, the DHS shelter system has continued to experience extremely low vacancy rates. Indeed, on October 9, 2015, the vacancy rate for adult family shelters was 0.11 percent and the vacancy rate for single adult shelters was 0.7 percent. DHS anticipates further strain on the single adult and adult family shelter system in the coming months.

 

Further, the City is currently faced with the critical need to find stable housing for hundreds of individuals who have been required to leave “three-quarter housing” for health and safety reasons.  Many of these individuals are currently occupying temporary housing pending relocation to permanent housing and are at risk of shelter entry if permanent, affordable housing cannot be found.  SEPS is urgently needed to provide rental assistance for many of these individuals to enable them to avoid entry into the DHS shelter system and relocate to stable housing.

 

SEPS provides an important new option for single adults and adult families who are homeless or at risk of homelessness that will allow more people to move from shelter to stable housing and decrease the number of entries to shelter, helping to reduce demands on the shelter system.

 

HRA’s authority for this emergency rule may be found in sections 34, 56, 61, 62, 77, and 131 of the New York Social Services Law, sections 603 and 1043 of the New York City Charter, and section 352.6 of title 18 of the New York Codes, Rules and Regulations. 

 

 

Subject: 

Special Exit and Prevention Supplement (SEPS) Program

Location: 
Spector Hall
22 Reade Street First Floor
New York , NY 10007
Contact: 

Proposed Rules: Closed to Comments

Agency:
Comment By: 
Thursday, November 12, 2015
Proposed Rules Content: 

Statement of Basis and Purpose of Proposed Rule

 

In order to implement the Mayor’s priority of assisting families and individuals experiencing homelessness in securing and maintaining stable and permanent housing in the community, the Commissioner of the New York City Human Resources Administration (HRA) proposes to add Chapter 10 to Title 68 of the Rules of the City of New York to continue implementation of the HRA HOME Tenant-Based Rental Assistance (HRA HOME TBRA) Program. The program, which was established by emergency rule issued on July 31, 2015, will provide rental assistance to a limited number of families with children, adult families and pregnant women currently residing in New York City Department of Homeless Services (DHS) and HRA shelters, as well as chronically street homeless individuals. To be eligible, households must be in receipt of supplemental security income, social security disability insurance benefits, social security survivors insurance benefits or social security retirement benefits.  This proposed rule is substantially similar to the emergency rule, but clarifies a number of provisions, including those addressing the household’s contribution towards the rent and absences from a unit towards which HRA HOME TBRA assistance is being applied, and also adds a section addressing break-ups of applicant and participant households. 

 

There is an urgent need for this program.  Shelter census data shows that the number of families with children and adult families in the DHS shelter system remains extremely high, even taking into account the hundreds of families who have already been able to leave shelter under existing HRA rental assistance programs.

 

Specifically, between January 1, 2002 and December 31, 2013 the number of families with children in the DHS shelter system increased by 63 percent, including an 80 percent increase in the number of children. As of May 29, 2015, there were 11,689 families with children in the DHS shelter system, including 23,331 children.  Similarly, the number of adult families in the DHS shelter system increased by 59 percent between July 1, 2004 and December 31, 2013.

As shelter census has increased, the DHS shelter system has continued to experience extremely low vacancy rates. Indeed, on September 23, 2015, the vacancy rate for shelters for families with children was 0.84 percent and the vacancy rate for adult family shelters was 0.48 percent.

 

Census data also demonstrates the urgent need for an additional program available to chronically street homeless individuals. In addition to the men and women in DHS shelters for single adults and adult families, the City estimates that as of January 2015 there were over 3,000 unsheltered individuals living on the streets, in parks, and in other public spaces of the City, including the subway system.

 

Finally, shelter census data also shows the urgent need for a rental assistance program targeted to those in receipt of various forms of social security benefits.  Households in receipt of such benefits comprise approximately 24 percent of the families with children and approximately 40 percent of the adult families in the City shelter system. A number of individuals served in DHS Street Homeless Programs who are in receipt of social security benefits may also benefit from this program.

 

Over a two-year period, the HRA HOME TBRA Program will assist approximately 1,250 households to obtain permanent housing and become securely housed in the community.  

 

HRA’s authority for this proposed rule may be found in Sections 92.205 and 92.209 of Title 24 of the Code of Federal Regulations; the City of New York’s Consolidated Plan, promulgated pursuant to Part 91 of Title 24 of the Code of Federal Regulations and approved by the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development on May 29, 2015; Sections 34, 56, 61, 62, 77, and 131 of the New York Social Services Law; and Sections 603 and 1043 of the New York City Charter.

 

“Shall” and “must” denote mandatory requirements and may be used interchangeably in the rules of this department, unless otherwise specified or unless the context clearly indicates otherwise.

 

 

 

Subject: 

HRA Home Tenant -Based Rental Assistance Program

Location: 
Spector Hall
22 Reade Street First Floor
New York , NY 10007
Contact: 

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